Upcoming Books and Exhibitions for December 2018

Books

Somehow I only have one book for December so, as usual, that probably means I’m missing a lot of stuff!

The one book I have on my tracking sheet is an academic work Michelle L. Beer entitled Queenship at the Renaissance Courts of Britain: Catherine of Aragon and Margaret Tudor, 1503-1533 which comes out on December 20 in both the US and UK.

Event

The Tudor Society Open Weekend 2018

The Tudor Society will have an open weekend for non-members from December 7 to 9 where you can register and explore the site as if you were a member. Click the link above for more information!

Continuing Exhibitions

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston is hosting an exhibition organized by the National Portrait Gallery, London entitled Tudors to Windsors: British Royal Portraits from Holbein to Warhol which opened on October 7, 2018 and runs through January 27, 2019.

Royal Sudeley 1000 – Trials, Triumphs and Treasures – Sudeley Castle has refurbished their exhibition rooms for their 2018 open season that runs from March 5 to December 21.

Upcoming Books and Exhibitions for November 2018

Books

A couple of previously-released books have a US edition coming this month, starting with The Mythology of the ‘Princes in the Tower’ by the late John Ashdown-Hill. It was released over the summer in the UK and is out on November 1 in the US.

Next up, Kate Williams’ The Betrayal of Mary, Queen of Scots: Elizabeth I and Her Greatest Rival (US title) will be released on November 13 after it was released in September in the UK.

And there are a few new releases this out this month as well!

Tracy Borman has a new work out entitled Henry VIII and the Men Who Made Him which will be out November 1 in the UK and early in 2019 in the US.

And finally, Devices and Desires: Bess of Hardwick and the Building of Elizabethan England by Kate Hubbard will also be out on November 1 in the UK and will out in February 2019 in the US.

Additional Items

The Anne Boleyn Files 2019 Calendar is now available for purchase! You can order it from the website here and below is a video of the pages for each month.

Continuing Exhibitions

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston is hosting an exhibition organized by the National Portrait Gallery, London entitled Tudors to Windsors: British Royal Portraits from Holbein to Warhol which opened on October 7, 2018 and runs through January 27, 2019. (And I’m thrilled that finally something is coming to my neck of the woods – I’m only about 2.5 hours from Houston so I expect to get a chance to go see it over the holidays!)

‘We are Bess’ opened at Hardwick Hall on October 3 and runs through November 4, then will re-open from February 16 to June 2 next year. The exhibition will also be available online – something I always appreciate for those of us who can’t easily visit in person.

Royal Sudeley 1000 – Trials, Triumphs and Treasures – Sudeley Castle has refurbished their exhibition rooms for their 2018 open season that runs from March 5 to December 21.

Upcoming Books, Events, and Exhibitions for October 2018

Happy October! Now I wish it would start feeling like fall here in central Texas.

Books

A couple of books that have previously had UK released will have US releases this month.

Nicola Clark’s Gender, Family, and Politics: The Howard Women, 1485-1558 was released over the summer in the UK and will be out on October 9 in the US.

And Diarmaid MacCulloch’s Thomas Cromwell: A Revolutionary Life (US title) will be released in the US at the end of October.

And there are some new releases this month too!

Suzannah Lipscomb has written a book on Witchcraft for the Ladybird Expert Series which is out October 4 in the UK and US. Just in time for Halloween!

And if you want to get a head start on Christmas, you can read how to do it Tudor style in this new work by Alison Weir and Siobhan Clarke, also out in early October.

And finally, Sarah-Beth Watkins examines the life of Anne of Cleves: Henry VIII’s Unwanted Wife in a new work due out October 26 in both the UK and US.

Events

The 2018 BBC History Weekends will be in Winchester on October 5-7 and York from October 19-21. Click on either of the banners to go to the page for that event to see the line-up and book tickets. (One of these days I’m going to actually make it over there for one of these events…)

New Exhibitions

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston is hosting an exhibition organized by the National Portrait Gallery, London entitled Tudors to Windsors: British Royal Portraits from Holbein to Warhol which opens on October 7, 2018 and runs through January 27, 2019. (And I’m thrilled that finally something is coming to my neck of the woods – I’m only about 2.5 hours from Houston so I expect to get a chance to go see it over the holidays!)

‘We are Bess’ opens at Hardwick Hall on October 3 and runs through November 4, then will re-open from February 16 to June 2 next year. The exhibition will also be available online – something I always appreciate for those of us who can’t easily visit in person.

A bit about the exhibition from the press release:

In the late sixteenth century, Bess became the second richest woman in the country after Elizabeth I. Along the way she experienced great loss and hardship – two children and four husbands died, at times she had massive debts and lawsuits against her, while her last, broken marriage became a national scandal.

Throughout history Bess has been portrayed as greedy, overbearing, and controlling, a view that derives largely from comments made by the disinherited family of her third husband and those of her estranged fourth husband.

Now, for the exhibition, ‘We are Bess’, 16 women [1] have been invited to respond to Bess’s story and consider the similarities between the challenges she faced in the sixteenth century and their own experiences.

Within the Hall’s Long Gallery, the responses and portraits of each of the participating women, taken by award-winning photographer Rachel Adams, will hang alongside original Tudor portraits.

Continuing Exhibitions

Royal Sudeley 1000 – Trials, Triumphs and Treasures – Sudeley Castle has refurbished their exhibition rooms for their 2018 open season that runs from March 5 to December 21.

Upcoming Books, Events, and Exhibitions for September 2018

Books

Quite a few new releases this month!

First up, Matthew Lewis has a biography of Richard III coming out on September 15 in the UK and US:

Next up, Rival Queens: The Betrayal of Mary, Queen of Scots by Kate Williams will be out September 20 in the UK and later this fall in the US under the title The Betrayal of Mary, Queen of Scots: Elizabeth I and Her Greatest Rival:

Diarmaid MacCulloch’s newest work, Thomas Cromwell: A Life is out September 27 in the UK and October 30 in the US with the slightly different title Thomas Cromwell: A Revolutionary Life:

Lauren Mackay takes a look at the male part of the Boleyn family in her newest work Among The Wolves of Court: Thomas and George Boleyn which is out in the UK at the end of the month and February 2019 in the US:

And finally for this month, Margaret Tudor: The Life of Henry VIII’s Sister by Melanie Clegg will be released September 30 in the UK and early in 2019 in the US.

Events

The 2018 BBC History Weekends will be in Winchester on October 5-7 and York from October 19-21. I know tickets sometimes run out for these, so I’m posting them a month ahead of schedule. Click on either of the banners to go to the page for that event to see the line-up and book tickets! (One of these days I’m going to actually make it over there for one of these events…)

Continuing Exhibitions

Royal Sudeley 1000 – Trials, Triumphs and Treasures – Sudeley Castle has refurbished their exhibition rooms for their 2018 open season that runs from March 5 to December 21.

Upcoming Books and Exhibitions for August 2018

Books

I knew some things got past me in recent months, so here are a couple of those books:

Imagining Shakespeare’s Wife: The Afterlife of Anne Hathaway by Katherine West Scheil came out in the UK back in late June, but the US version will be released at the end of August:

And the most recent work of the late John Ashdown-Hill, The Mythology of the ‘Princes in the Tower’ was released in July in the UK and will be out in November in the US.

And in other new releases Gender, Family, and Politics: The Howard Women, 1485-1558 by Nicola Clark is coming out on August 9 in the UK and October 9 in the US.

Continuing Exhibitions

Royal Sudeley 1000 – Trials, Triumphs and Treasures – Sudeley Castle has refurbished their exhibition rooms for their 2018 open season that runs from March 5 to December 21.

Upcoming Books, Events and Exhibitions for June 2018

Books

A couple of books that have already been released in the UK are now out in the US:

First up – Melita Thomas’ The King’s Pearl: Henry VIII and His Daughter Mary came out last fall in the UK and is now out in the US:

And La Reine Blanche: Mary Tudor A Life in Letters by Sarah Bryson is also now out in the US after a release earlier this year in the UK:

And in new releases – Claire Ridgway of The Anne Boleyn Files has teamed up with artist Dmitry Yakhovsky to create The Life of Anne Boleyn Colouring Book! You can order it from both the UK and US Amazon stores now:

Events

Henry – A Tudor Musical will run from June 13 to 16 at the Cecil Hepworth Playhouse in Walton on Thames (just west of Hampton Court Palace). You can learn more about the musical play and books tickets at the website of the Molesey Musical Theatre. And here is a synopsis with more information (PDF).

Exhibitions

Royal Sudeley 1000 – Trials, Triumphs and Treasures – Sudeley Castle has refurbished their exhibition rooms for their 2018 open season that runs from March 5 to December 21.

Upcoming Books, Events and Exhibitions for May 2018

Time for the round-up for the merry month of May!

Books

Four Queens and a Countess: Mary Queen of Scots, Elizabeth I, Mary I, Lady Jane Grey and Bess of Hardwick by Jill Armitage will be out in the US on May 1 after a release last year in the UK.

And there are some new books for May:

In more academic fare, Juana I: Legitimacy and Conflict in Sixteenth-Century Castile by Gillian B. Fleming, part of the Queenship and Power series, was released in April in the US and will be out on May 17 in the UK.

Natalie Grueninger and Kathryn Holeman have teamed up again for more Tudor coloring book fun! You can order Colouring History – Tudor Queens and Consorts from Amazon US and through ColouringTudorHistory.com

Events

I have a couple of upcoming Tudor history stage productions coming up, one for May and one for June:

First up, Put Out the Lights by Joanna Carrick will run from May 8 to 27 at The Avenue Theatre in Ipswich. Tickets can be purchased at the Red Rose Chain website.
About the play:

1538. Ipswich is a place of dark secrets and divided loyalties. A preacher is dragged from his pulpit, arrested for protestant heresy, while Cromwell sends agents to dismantle the Town’s beloved Catholic Shrine and burn the statue of Our Lady. From day to day the world is changing and it’s hard to know what to believe, what to say and above all who to trust.

And in June, Henry – A Tudor Musical will run from June 13 to 16 at the Cecil Hepworth Playhouse in Walton on Thames (just west of Hampton Court Palace). You can learn more about the musical play and books tickets at the website of the Molesey Musical Theatre. And here is a synopsis with more information (PDF).

Exhibitions

Closing this month:

The National Gallery of Art in Washington DC is hosting an exhibition on Michel Sittow that opened on January 28, 2018 and runs to May 13, 2018. Sittow is probably most associated for fans of Tudor history with the portrait of what has long been identified as a young Catherine of Aragon. We had a discussion on the Q&A blog about the portrait being re-identified as Mary Tudor (Brandon) and it seems that the exhibition is now using that identification as well (although calling her “Mary Rose Tudor”). You can find out more about the exhibition here.

New Exhibitions

Royal Sudeley 1000 – Trials, Triumphs and Treasures – Sudeley Castle has refurbished their exhibition rooms for their 2018 open season that runs from March 5 to December 21. (This is also reminding me that as of this May it will be 20 years since I visited Sudeley! I really need to get back soon.)

Upcoming Books and Exhibitions for April 2018

Books

A number of books that have previously been released in the UK are coming out in the US this month, starting with Tudor Monarchs: Lives in Letters by Andrea Clarke, which will be out in the US on April 1.

Also on April 1, Amy Licence’s Anne Boleyn: Adultery, Heresy, Desire will be out in the US:

On April 10, Francis I: The Maker of Modern France will have a US release:

Next up is Helen Castor’s book on Elizabeth I for the Penguin Monarchs series, Elizabeth I: A Study in Insecurity which is due out on April 24 in the US:

And finally, Chris Skidmore’s Richard III: England’s Most Controversial King (the US title) is out April 24 as well:

Exhibitions

The National Gallery of Art in Washington DC is hosting an exhibition on Michel Sittow that opened on January 28, 2018 and runs to May 13, 2018. Sittow is probably most associated for fans of Tudor history with the portrait of what has long been identified as a young Catherine of Aragon. We had a discussion on the Q&A blog about the portrait being re-identified as Mary Tudor (Brandon) and it seems that the exhibition is now using that identification as well (although calling her “Mary Rose Tudor”). You can find out more about the exhibition here.

Upcoming Books and Exhibitions for March 2018

Books

Just one book coming out in the US this month that has already been released in the UK – Nicola Tallis’ Elizabeth’s Rival: The Tumultuous Tale of Lettice Knollys, Countess of Leicester, which will be out on March 6.

And a few new books are due out this month as well, starting with Helen Castor’s Elizabeth I: A Study in Insecurity, part of the Penguin Monarchs series. It will be out in April as a hardcover in the US although you can get the Kindle edition now.

Next up is a look at Henry VIII’s cross-channel rival, Francis I: The Maker of Modern France by Leonie Frieda. It is out March 8 in the UK and in April in the US:

Another work is out in the Queenship and Power series of academic works – Elizabeth I in Writing: Language, Power and Representation in Early Modern England, edited by Donatella Montini and Iolanda Plescia. It is due out on March 21 is both the UK and US.

And finally, Derek Wilson’s most recent Tudor work, The Queen and the Heretic: How two women changed the religion of England about Queen Katherine Parr and Anne Askew will be out later in March is the UK and possibly the US (I found conflicting publication info).

Exhibitions

The National Gallery of Art in Washington DC is hosting an exhibition on Michel Sittow that opened on January 28, 2018 and runs to May 13, 2018. Sittow is probably most associated for fans of Tudor history with the portrait of what has long been identified as a young Catherine of Aragon. We had a discussion on the Q&A blog about the portrait being re-identified as Mary Tudor (Brandon) and it seems that the exhibition is now using that identification as well (although calling her “Mary Rose Tudor”). You can find out more about the exhibition here.

Upcoming Books and Exhibitions for February 2018

How is is almost February already? (Yes, I probably say – or at least think – this every new year)

Books

Here’s one I missed from late last year – Four Queens and a Countess: Mary Queen of Scots, Elizabeth I, Mary I, Lady Jane Grey and Bess of Hardwick by Jill Armitage was released back in December in the UK and will be out in hardback in the US in May.

And the one February release I have on my spreadsheet is Sarah Bryson’s La Reine Blanche: Mary Tudor A Life in Letters. I love books of letters of Tudor figures, so I’m really looking forward to this one! It is due out mid-February in the UK and in June in the US.

Exhibitions

The National Gallery of Art in Washington DC is hosting an exhibition on Michel Sittow from January 28, 2018 to May 13, 2018. Sittow is probably most associated for fans of Tudor history with the portrait of what has long been identified as a young Catherine of Aragon. We had a discussion on the Q&A blog about the portrait being re-identified as Mary Tudor (Brandon) and it seems that the exhibition is now using that identification as well (although calling her “Mary Rose Tudor”). You can find out more about the exhibition here.

Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for January 2018

Pretty light round-up to start 2018, but as always that probably means I’m missing a bunch of things!

Books

Amy Licence’s The Lost Kings: Lancaster, York and Tudor is now out in the US in hardcover after being released last summer in the UK.

And in new books, an academic work Emotion in the Tudor Court: Literature, History, and Early Modern Feeling by Bradley J. Irish is due out in both the UK and US on January 15 and will be offered in both hardcover and paperback, lessening that ‘academic price’ sting! (Links to paperback editions below)

Events

Peterborough Cathedral’s annual Katherine of Aragon Festival for 2018 will be held from Thursday January 28th through Sunday January 28th.

Continuing Exhibitions and Displays

Closing this weekend!Henry VII: The First Royal Portrait opened at the Museum of Somerset on October 17, 2017 and runs through January 6, 2018. The 1505 portrait of Henry VII is on loan to the museum from the National Portrait Gallery. Check the link for more information, including associated events.

Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for December 2017

Books

I have only one book listed as a new release this month (as always, that probably means I’m missing a bunch!).

Sarah-Beth Watkins has a new work out titled Margaret Tudor, Queen of Scots: The Life of King Henry VIII’s Sister which will be out in both the UK and US in early December:

And one title that has already been released in the UK will be out in the US in December:

Discovering Tudor London: A Journey Back in Time by Natalie Grueninger was published in the UK over the summer and will be out in paperback in the US on December 1.

Continuing Exhibitions and Displays

Reformation – Shattered World, New Beginnings opened on June 26 and runs through December 15 at the Senate House Library at the University of London. You can download a digital copy of the exhibition catalogue for free at the website.

Henry VII: The First Royal Portrait opened at the Museum of Somerset on October 17, 2017 and runs through January 6, 2018. The 1505 portrait of Henry VII is on loan to the museum from the National Portrait Gallery. Check the link for more information, including associated events.

Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for November 2017

Books

This month we have a few books that were already released in the UK and are out in November in the US.

First up, Nathen Amin’s House of Beaufort: The Bastard Line that Captured the Crown is out on November 1 in the US after a summer release in the UK:

Next is Miranda Kaufmann’s Black Tudors, which was released last month in the UK and will be out on November 7 in the US:

And there are a couple of new releases coming out this month (again, first in the UK and months later in the US… at least in print – I’ve noticed that the Kindle versions are sometimes coming out at the same time as the initial print release overseas).

First is Elizabeth’s Rival: The Tumultuous Tale of Lettice Knollys, Countess of Leicester by Nicola Tallis which is due out on November 2 in the UK and next March in the US.

And finally, Amy Licence’s latest Tudor work, Anne Boleyn: Adultery, Heresy, Desire is out mid-month in the UK and will be released next April in the US with the title Anne Boleyn: Femme Fatale

Events

The second of 2017’s BBC History Magazine’s History Weekends will be held on November 24 – 26 in York. Details on speakers and tickets are at the link.

Continuing Exhibitions and Displays

Henry VII: The First Royal Portrait opened at the Museum of Somerset on October 17, 2017 and runs through January 6, 2018. The 1505 portrait of Henry VII is on loan to the museum from the National Portrait Gallery. Check the link for more information, including associated events.

Reformation – Shattered World, New Beginnings opened on June 26 and runs through December 15 at the Senate House Library at the University of London. You can download a digital copy of the exhibition catalogue for free at the website.

The King’s Pearl Blog Tour – Mary and the Exeter Conspiracy

I’m pleased to be the next stop on the blog tour for Melita Thomas’ The King’s Pearl. You can see all of the previous and upcoming stops here: The King’s Pearl Blog Tour Starts Today, which I have updated with the posts so far and will add the remaining stops as they occur.

And now – over to Melita to tell us about Mary and the Exeter Conspiracy:

A head filled with ‘fantasies’.

In June 1536, when Mary finally signed the articles agreeing that her parents’ marriage had been invalid, and that she herself was illegitimate, she was probably comforted by the thought that her friends were now safe. Part of the campaign to force her to submit had involved investigation of her former household members – Anne, Lady Hussey, had been imprisoned for six weeks for calling Mary ‘princess’. Letters from Elizabeth, Lady Carew, had led to questions being asked of Lady Carew, and her husband, Sir Nicholas, despite him being a member of Henry’s own Privy Chamber.

But even after Mary had surrendered and signed the documents, Carew and another of Mary’s supporters, Sir Anthony Browne, were interrogated by the Privy Council as to whether they thought that, with Queen Anne now dead, Mary should be named as Henry’s heir. Both swore that they would obey the law, although they believed that Mary would be a very suitable heir until Henry had a son. Apparently satisfied, Henry and his council took no further steps against them.

That final ordeal over, Mary and her friends could settle down with a sigh of relief. Even the Pilgrimage of Grace, of 1536, which had, as one of its aims, the restoration of Mary as Henry’s heir, and potentially her marriage to Reginald Pole, son of her former governess, Lady Salisbury, and great-nephew of Edward IV, did not harm her – although Lord Hussey, who had once been her chamberlain, was executed in its wake. With the birth of Prince Edward in October 1537, there seemed no reason for Henry to fear any further assault on his kingship.

But in 1538, there were rumours of a plot against the king. Geoffrey Pole, another son of the Countess of Salisbury, was reported to Thomas Cromwell, Henry’s chief minister, for communicating with his brother, Reginald. Reginald, who had been educated at Henry VIII’s expense, and offered the archbishopric of York in return for supporting the annulment of Henry’s marriage to Katharine of Aragon, had not only rejected the annulment, but had written an inflammatory and deeply insulting diatribe against Henry. Whilst Lady Salisbury and her eldest son, Henry, Lord Montagu, had condemned Reginald’s book, and urged him to obey the king, the family had not cut off communication with him, and the suggestion that Mary might marry him, had never completely gone away.

Cromwell was informed that Geoffrey was not just writing to Reginald, but was also sending him ‘all the secrets of the realm’ and had warned his brother of a government plot to assassinate him. Since Geoffrey was not a Privy Councillor, he must have been hearing any state secrets from someone else.

Cromwell soon found a means to discover who – Geoffrey was sent to the Tower and brow-beaten to the extent of attempting suicide. Eventually, he told his interrogators that he had received information from his brother, Lord Montagu; Elizabeth Darrell, once one of Katharine of Aragon’s maids-of-honour, and now the mistress of Sir Thomas Wyatt, and Gertrude Blount, Marchioness of Exeter. Lady Exeter was an old friend of Mary’s and had been vociferous in her support for Katharine, as well as being embroiled in the case of Elizabeth Barton, the ‘Holy’ Nun of Kent, executed for prophesying the king’s demise in the event of his marrying Anne Boleyn.

Soon the pall of suspicion was also cast over Lady Exeter’s husband, Henry Courtenay, Marquis of Exeter. Coincidentally – or not – Exeter and Montagu were Henry VIII’s closest English male relatives, being the grandson and great-nephew respectively, of Edward IV. Both had been close to the king since boyhood, and Henry was probably deeply wounded to hear that they had criticised him personally, Montagu remarking that ‘the king is full of flesh and unwieldy, and… cannot long continue with his sore leg’. Montagu, Exeter and Lady Exeter were sent to the Tower, as was another old friend and distant relative, Sir Edward Nevill, quoted as describing Henry as ‘a beast and worse than a beast.’

There was little or no evidence against Exeter, apart from the possibility that he had been passing on Privy Council information, but he and Cromwell had quarrelled violently, and so the minister may have been happy to paint him as a conspirator. The main concern, for which Henry perhaps had some justification, was that Reginald Pole was plotting with the Emperor and the King of France to invade. The alleged conspirators might have been tempted to aid an invasion, rather than resist it, and then arrange for Mary to marry Reginald (although a cardinal, he had not taken Holy Orders). The couple would thus unite the old Yorkist blood with the new Tudor blood, and reign together.

In December 1538, Exeter, Montagu and Nevill were executed; Geoffrey Pole was pardoned but remained in prison, along with Lady Exeter and her sons, whilst Lady Salisbury was first put under house arrest, then taken to the Tower as well.

Where was Mary in all this? These people were her relatives, supporters and friends, and she herself would potentially have been a gainer, had there really been a plot to overthrow Henry, rather than just criticise him. Yet there was never any suggestion that she was involved in any way, and, in fact, Cromwell took pains to ensure her name was kept out of it, blaming the Exeters and Poles for filling her head with ‘fantasies’ and ‘suborning’ her in the early 1530s into refusing to accept the annulment of her parents’ marriage.

Mary’s reaction to the news of the arrests in late 1538 was physical. She was prone to severe stomach complaints when under stress, and she succumbed again, spending much of Christmas and New Year too sick or faint to get out of bed. Her attendant, Lady Kingston, sent a message to Henry requesting that he send his physician, Doctor Butts to minister to her, as he had previously treated her for the same symptoms.

Early the following year, Sir Nicholas Carew, too, was arrested, despite him having promoted Henry’s marriage to Jane Seymour, which had resulted in the longed-for son. At this point, the Imperial Ambassador, Eustace Chapuys, became concerned. He had heard that some of Carew’s letters, and his own, had been found in the coffers of Lady Exeter and were being looked at with suspicious eyes. Knowing that the only people he had written to in England were Katharine of Aragon, before her death, and Mary, he was surprised at the news. He was sure that anything he had sent Mary that might be incriminating would have been burnt by her. But, if she were asked to produce his letters to her, it might seem strange for her not to have any so he wrote a dozen or so innocuous ones for her to hand over, if questioned.

Carew, pressed to confess to treason of some sort, but with nothing to say, could only offer that the Marquis of Exeter had looked ‘melancholy’ at the birth of Prince Edward. Since Exeter was already dead, the discovery of such treasonable facial expressions could not harm him. Chapuys ascribed Exeter’s less-than-enthusiastic reaction to Edward’s birth as based on his affection for Mary, and similarly, he thought Carew devoted to her.

Reginald Pole’s response to the execution of his brother was to write another invective against Henry, and Cromwell, too, calling him the spawn of the devil. Henry, fearing that Reginald would come to England, wrote to Emperor Charles, asking that the cardinal be detained in the Empire as he had a ‘viper’s nature’ and was plotting not just against Henry, but all his children – including Mary. This leads to an interesting question – was Mary aware before the arrests, that there was murmuring against Henry, and a proposal that she should marry Reginald? Or did it all come as a complete, and most upsetting surprise to her? Did she curse her so-called friends for endangering not just their own, but perhaps her life, through careless talk, or was she sorry that there was no real plot?

The ramifications of the so-called Exeter conspiracy continued. In May 1541, Lady Salisbury, 69 years old, the cousin of Henry’s mother, Elizabeth of York, and a woman Mary once called her ‘second mother’, was dragged out of her cell at the Tower of London, and executed without trial, by a bungling youth. Her last words were a prayer for the king, the queen (Katheryn Howard), Prince Edward and Mary.

Lady Exeter was released, and restored to favour in Mary’s own reign, until Mary realised that her father’s suspicions about Lady Exeter’s ambitions for her family had some justification – having once been Mary’s friend, in 1554 Lady Exeter vigorously promoted the idea that Mary should marry her younger son, Edward Courtenay, rather than Mary’s own choice of husband, Philip of Spain. Young Courtenay rather fancied being king, and was willing, if he could not marry Mary himself, to overthrow her, and marry her half-sister Elizabeth. Spared his life by Mary, on his mother’s pleading, he was exiled and died in Italy in 1556 – the last sprig of the White Rose.

Sunday Short Takes

Just a couple of things, mostly related to stuff I posted in the Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for October 2017 last weekend:

* Miranda Kaufmann has a website related to her new book Black Tudors, including brief bios of Ten Black Tudors who are featured in the book, and details on her book tour throughout England.

* The Mary Rose lit up my news alerts last week – first with stories saying that it is in danger of collapse and then more of a clarification saying that it wasn’t in danger of collapse, but that it is in need of a new support system. Next week is the 35th anniversary of the raising of the ship and there are still tickets available for the Anniversary Lectures next weekend.

* And finally, I received an email that the score to the movie Lady Jane has been released. I haven’t seen the movie in a while, but I remember that it a lovely score. One thing that a lot of people might not know about me is that I’m a life-long film score buff and it’s always great to see old scores released even many, many years after the movie came out. You can learn more about this release and listen to sample tracks here. Links to purchase through my Amazon affiliates below:

The King’s Pearl Blog Tour Starts Today!

I’ll be part of the tour in the second week, but here are all the places you can see the whole tour:

Mon. 2nd Oct. – Tudor Times – Deborah Roil – www.tudortimes.co.uk‘The King’s Pearl’: An overview

Tues. 3rd Oct. – Sandra Alvarez – http://www.medievalists.net/‘A Perfect Friendship’: Mary and Thomas Cromwell

Wed. 4th Oct. – Sarah Bryson – www.sarah-bryson.comSarah Bryson’s interview with Melita Thomas

Thurs. 5th Oct. – Moniek Bloks – www.historyofroyalwomen.com‘Your most humble daughter’: Mary and Katherine Parr

Fri. 6th Oct. – Natalie Grueninger – www.onthetudortrail.com‘She is my death and I am hers’: Mary & Anne

Sat. 7th Oct. – Susan Higginbotham – http:/www.susanhigginbotham.com/blog/‘My second mother’: Mary and Lady Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury

Sun. 8th Oct. – Nathen Amin Blog – www.https://henrytudorsociety.com/Mary, Princess of Wales

Mon. 9th Oct. – Tamise Hills – http://www.ladyjanegrey.info/Mary and the Grey Family

Tues. 10th Oct. – Lara Eakins – http://tudorhistory.org/blog/‘A head filled with fantasies’: Mary and the Exeter Conspiracy

Wed. 11th Oct. – Carolyn Harris – http://www.royalhistorian.com/A review by Carolyn Harris

Thurs. 12th Oct. – Rebecca Larson – http://www.tudorsdynasty.com/Pastimes for a Princess

Fri. 13th Oct. – Amy Licence – http://amylicence.weebly.com/‘My beloved future Empress’: Mary and the Emperor Charles V

Sat. 14th Oct. – Tudor Times – Deborah Roil – www.tudortimes.co.uk – Sibling rivalry: Mary, Edward and Elizabeth

Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for October 2017

New Books
New this month is a book I’ve been looking forward to for a while, Miranda Kaufmann’s Black Tudors: The Untold Story. I’m really hoping it comes out in Audible so there’s a good chance I’ll actually get to read (okay, listen) to it soon! It is out on October 5 in the UK and November 14 in the US in hardback.

More Books

One book I missed from last month – Amy Robsart: A Life and Its End by Christine Hartweg came out in September in the US and UK:

Several books that have been out in the UK for a while will be out in the US in October:

Colouring History: The Tudors by Natalie Grueninger and Kathryn Holeman is now officially out in the US, although I got my pre-order from Amazon weeks ago!

And Terry Breverton’s Owen Tudor: Founding Father of the Tudor Dynasty is also now out in hardcover in the US (although the Kindle version was available earlier):

Lauren Johnson’s So Great a Prince: The Accession of Henry VIII: 1509 (US title), which was released last year in the UK is now out in the US. UK link goes to the paperback edition which was released back in February:

Events


The Mary Rose Trust Anniversary Lectures – Celebrating 35 years since the raising of the Mary Rose. Details on how to purchase tickets are available at the link.

Join us to celebrate the 35th Anniversary of the raising of the Mary Rose with two days of fascinating talks. We will be welcoming speakers such as Dr Miranda Kaufmann, Dr Fred Hocker who is Head of Research at the Vasa Museum, Professor Jon Adams and noted historian Dr David Starkey.

The talks are taking place over two days (Friday 13th and Saturday 14th October 2017), starting at 10am each day until around 3:30pm, in the Princess Royal Gallery at the National Museum of the Royal Navy, on site at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard.

Refreshments, including a free lunch, will be provided throughout the day and both days will conclude with a visit the Mary Rose Museum.


BBC History Magazine’s History Weekends for 2017 will be held on October 6 – 8 in Winchester and November 24 – 26 in York. Details on speakers and tickets are at the link.

New Display

Henry VII: The First Royal Portrait opens at the Museum of Somerset on October 17, 2017 and runs through January 6, 2018. The 1505 portrait of Henry VII is on loan to the museum from the National Portrait Gallery. Check the link for more information, including associated events.

Continuing Exhibitions and Displays

The first two of these are ending this month:

The Encounter – Drawings from Leonardo to Rembrandt opened at the National Portrait Gallery, London on July 12 and runs through October 22. Tickets can be booked at the gallery’s website linked above. More about the exhibition:

The creative encounter between individual artists and sitters is explored in this major exhibition featuring portrait drawings by some of the outstanding masters of the Renaissance and Baroque periods.

Waddesdon Manor in Buckinghamshire is Power & Portraiture: painting at the court of Elizabeth I opened on June 7 and will run through October 29, 2017 at From the website:

A special display exploring how Elizabeth I and her courtiers used portraits to fashion their public image and promote themselves in a glamorous, dangerous world.

Two spectacular panel paintings by Nicholas Hilliard will be accompanied by loans from the Royal Collection and National Portrait Gallery. Visitors will learn about the scientific and scholarly detective work that has led to this important discovery and will be able to compare it with the famous ‘Phoenix’ portrait of Elizabeth I.

Images of the queen will be flanked by those of her charismatic suitor, Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, her ambassador to France, Sir Amias Paulet and the doomed nobleman, Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk.

Reformation – Shattered World, New Beginnings opened on June 26 and runs through December 15 at the Senate House Library at the University of London. You can download a digital copy of the exhibition catalogue for free at the website (something I like to see more of for those of us who can’t make it to a lot of these events and don’t want to pay for the expensive shipping to the US!).

Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for September 2017

Yay September! We’re starting into my favorite time of year!

Books

Although I posted about it a couple of months ago, it appears that Elizabeth of York and Her Six Daughters-in-Law: Fashioning Tudor Queenship, 1485-1547 by Retha Warnicke has been delayed until September 26, so I’m posting it again.

Another update – Colouring History: The Tudors by Natalie Grueninger and Kathryn Holeman is still listed with an October 1 release date in the US, but I’ve already received my pre-order copy so if you order it now you might get it before October 1.

Next up – Tudor Fashion: Dress at Court by Eleri Lynn was released last month in the UK and is due out on September 12 in the US.

In new books out this month, The King’s Pearl: Henry VIII and His Daughter Mary by Melita Thomas will be out in mid-September in the UK and next year in the US. Assuming I answered my email in time, keep an eye out at this site for a stop on the blog tour for this book!

And Chris Skidmore’s newest work, Richard III: Brother, Protector, King will be out in the UK on September 21 and is due out next year in the US with the title Richard III: England’s Most Controversial King.

Events

Here’s another one that I’m going to post a month earlier in case tickets sell out: The Mary Rose Trust Anniversary Lectures – Celebrating 35 years since the raising of the Mary Rose. More details will be posted at the website and I’ll probably have another separate post about it when the press releases go out.

Continuing Exhibitions and Displays

The Encounter – Drawings from Leonardo to Rembrandt opened at the National Portrait Gallery, London on July 12 and runs through October 22. Tickets can be booked at the gallery’s website linked above. More about the exhibition:

The creative encounter between individual artists and sitters is explored in this major exhibition featuring portrait drawings by some of the outstanding masters of the Renaissance and Baroque periods.

Waddesdon Manor in Buckinghamshire is Power & Portraiture: painting at the court of Elizabeth I opened on June 7 and will run through October 29, 2017 at From the website:

A special display exploring how Elizabeth I and her courtiers used portraits to fashion their public image and promote themselves in a glamorous, dangerous world.

Two spectacular panel paintings by Nicholas Hilliard will be accompanied by loans from the Royal Collection and National Portrait Gallery. Visitors will learn about the scientific and scholarly detective work that has led to this important discovery and will be able to compare it with the famous ‘Phoenix’ portrait of Elizabeth I.

Images of the queen will be flanked by those of her charismatic suitor, Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, her ambassador to France, Sir Amias Paulet and the doomed nobleman, Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk.

Reformation – Shattered World, New Beginnings opened on June 26 and runs through December 15 at the Senate House Library at the University of London. You can download a digital copy of the exhibition catalogue for free at the website (something I like to see more of for those of us who can’t make it to a lot of these events and don’t want to pay for the expensive shipping to the US!).

Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for August 2017

Books

A nice variety of new books of interest are due out in August!

First up is Amy Licence’s latest work, The Lost Kings: Lancaster, York and Tudor, which is due out August 1 in the UK and in early 2018 in the US.

Next is the latest from On the Tudor Trail’s Natalie Grueninger, Discovering Tudor London: A Journey Back in Time which will be released August 7 in the UK and in December in the US.

Nathen Amin, author of Tudor Wales latest book is House of Beaufort: The Bastard Line that Captured the Crown. It will be released on August 15 in the UK and in early November in the US.

And finally, Tudor Fashion: Dress at Court by Eleri Lynn will be released on August 22 in the UK and will be out in the US on September 12 in the US.

Events

The Bosworth Medieval Festival 2017 is on August 19 and 20 and will feature, among many other things, a talk by Leanda de Lisle on “Tudor: The Family Story”.

Continuing Exhibitions and Displays

Blood Royal: Picturing the Tudor Monarchy opened on July 25 and runs through August 25 at The Society of Antiquaries of London. They now have a virtual version of the exhibition available online.

The Encounter – Drawings from Leonardo to Rembrandt opened at the National Portrait Gallery, London on July 12 and runs through October 22. Tickets can be booked at the gallery’s website linked above. More about the exhibition:

The creative encounter between individual artists and sitters is explored in this major exhibition featuring portrait drawings by some of the outstanding masters of the Renaissance and Baroque periods.

Waddesdon Manor in Buckinghamshire is Power & Portraiture: painting at the court of Elizabeth I opened on June 7 and will run through October 29, 2017 at From the website:

A special display exploring how Elizabeth I and her courtiers used portraits to fashion their public image and promote themselves in a glamorous, dangerous world.

Two spectacular panel paintings by Nicholas Hilliard will be accompanied by loans from the Royal Collection and National Portrait Gallery. Visitors will learn about the scientific and scholarly detective work that has led to this important discovery and will be able to compare it with the famous ‘Phoenix’ portrait of Elizabeth I.

Images of the queen will be flanked by those of her charismatic suitor, Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, her ambassador to France, Sir Amias Paulet and the doomed nobleman, Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk.

Reformation – Shattered World, New Beginnings opened on June 26 and runs through December 15 at the Senate House Library at the University of London. You can download a digital copy of the exhibition catalogue for free at the website (something I like to see more of for those of us who can’t make it to a lot of these events and don’t want to pay for the expensive shipping to the US!).