Picture of the Week #489

This week marks the third anniversary of the reburial of Richard III, so I figured it was finally time to use another one of my photos from my visit to Leicester Cathedral just two months later. (Which also means it has now been almost three years since my last trip to England… too long!)

Tomb of Richard III at Leicester Cathedral. Photo May 2015.

Sunday Short Takes

Long overdue! Some of these date back over a month, but in my defense, most of February was a blur so it feels like we just went from January straight to March.

* The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Galleries to open on 11th June – A date has been announced for the opening of Westminster Abbey’s new galleries up in the medieval Triforium. I can’t wait to visit this (someday)!

* Blanche Parry’s life at the side of Queen Elizabeth IBlanche Parry is one of history’s most influential Welsh women, yet few know the name and only a handful know her story.

* Victoria Art Gallery’s Henry VIII portrait confirmed as original Tudor paintingA painting of Henry VIII belonging to Bath & North East Somerset Council’s Victoria Art Gallery has been confirmed as an original Tudor work.

* Dedication Is What You NeedSeemingly inconsequential, dedicating books to royalty was a vital part of Tudor publishing.

* How Americans Preserved British EnglishAmericans today pronounce some words more like Shakespeare than Brits do… but it’s in 18th-Century England where they’d really feel at home.

* Tulip Procession held at Bradgate Park to mark anniversary of Lady Jane Grey’s executionBradgate Park hosted the event, which is the first of several happening this year

* X-ray probe to save Mary Rose cannonballsResearchers are using powerful X-rays to look inside cannonballs found on the famous Tudor ship, the Mary Rose. They are trying to find a way of preserving the shot, which will corrode if it is put on display.

And finally –

Here’s another talk by Leanda de Lisle, this time on the Tudor family story. From the video description:

In June 1485, Richard III issued a warning. England faced an invader, ‘one Henry Tudor who usurps the title of this realm as every man knows’. So who was Henry Tudor? Leanda de Lisle tells his family story, and unravels the murder mystery of the lost princes in the Tower.

Upcoming Books and Exhibitions for March 2018

Books

Just one book coming out in the US this month that has already been released in the UK – Nicola Tallis’ Elizabeth’s Rival: The Tumultuous Tale of Lettice Knollys, Countess of Leicester, which will be out on March 6.

And a few new books are due out this month as well, starting with Helen Castor’s Elizabeth I: A Study in Insecurity, part of the Penguin Monarchs series. It will be out in April as a hardcover in the US although you can get the Kindle edition now.

Next up is a look at Henry VIII’s cross-channel rival, Francis I: The Maker of Modern France by Leonie Frieda. It is out March 8 in the UK and in April in the US:

Another work is out in the Queenship and Power series of academic works – Elizabeth I in Writing: Language, Power and Representation in Early Modern England, edited by Donatella Montini and Iolanda Plescia. It is due out on March 21 is both the UK and US.

And finally, Derek Wilson’s most recent Tudor work, The Queen and the Heretic: How two women changed the religion of England about Queen Katherine Parr and Anne Askew will be out later in March is the UK and possibly the US (I found conflicting publication info).

Exhibitions

The National Gallery of Art in Washington DC is hosting an exhibition on Michel Sittow that opened on January 28, 2018 and runs to May 13, 2018. Sittow is probably most associated for fans of Tudor history with the portrait of what has long been identified as a young Catherine of Aragon. We had a discussion on the Q&A blog about the portrait being re-identified as Mary Tudor (Brandon) and it seems that the exhibition is now using that identification as well (although calling her “Mary Rose Tudor”). You can find out more about the exhibition here.

Upcoming Books and Exhibitions for February 2018

How is is almost February already? (Yes, I probably say – or at least think – this every new year)

Books

Here’s one I missed from late last year – Four Queens and a Countess: Mary Queen of Scots, Elizabeth I, Mary I, Lady Jane Grey and Bess of Hardwick by Jill Armitage was released back in December in the UK and will be out in hardback in the US in May.

And the one February release I have on my spreadsheet is Sarah Bryson’s La Reine Blanche: Mary Tudor A Life in Letters. I love books of letters of Tudor figures, so I’m really looking forward to this one! It is due out mid-February in the UK and in June in the US.

Exhibitions

The National Gallery of Art in Washington DC is hosting an exhibition on Michel Sittow from January 28, 2018 to May 13, 2018. Sittow is probably most associated for fans of Tudor history with the portrait of what has long been identified as a young Catherine of Aragon. We had a discussion on the Q&A blog about the portrait being re-identified as Mary Tudor (Brandon) and it seems that the exhibition is now using that identification as well (although calling her “Mary Rose Tudor”). You can find out more about the exhibition here.

Sunday Short Takes

Welcome to 2018! I have some stuff from the end of 2017 – and a few new things – that didn’t get posted in my very lazy break from work.

* Westminster Abbey’s attics yield a treasure trove of stained glass

* Hull’s Henry VIII blockhouse dig ‘bit of a gem’

* She opened her own doors: ASU history professor retires from pioneering career – Article about historian Retha Warnicke upon her retirement from Arizona State University

And finally – the program on Lady Jane Grey that I mentioned back in August is now scheduled to air on BBC 4 on January 9, 10, and 11.

More info: Episode 1, Episode 2, and Episode 3 and a trailer –

Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for January 2018

Pretty light round-up to start 2018, but as always that probably means I’m missing a bunch of things!

Books

Amy Licence’s The Lost Kings: Lancaster, York and Tudor is now out in the US in hardcover after being released last summer in the UK.

And in new books, an academic work Emotion in the Tudor Court: Literature, History, and Early Modern Feeling by Bradley J. Irish is due out in both the UK and US on January 15 and will be offered in both hardcover and paperback, lessening that ‘academic price’ sting! (Links to paperback editions below)

Events

Peterborough Cathedral’s annual Katherine of Aragon Festival for 2018 will be held from Thursday January 28th through Sunday January 28th.

Continuing Exhibitions and Displays

Closing this weekend!Henry VII: The First Royal Portrait opened at the Museum of Somerset on October 17, 2017 and runs through January 6, 2018. The 1505 portrait of Henry VII is on loan to the museum from the National Portrait Gallery. Check the link for more information, including associated events.