Archive Post: BBC History write-up

Hello to anyone who stumbles on the site after our write-up in the September issue of BBC History! I was very flattered by the mention and am now feeling very guilty for not having worked very hard on the site for the past two years (coincidentally the time when I started taking classes again!). Although I don’t anticipate any substantial free time over the next few months, I think the guilt may get to me and I’ll try to work more on the site.

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Archive Post: Back from vacation 2003

Hello all! I’m back! Had a great time in England and Wales. I’ll be posting some of the photos eventually, along with a write-up of the Elizabeth exhibition at Greenwich (which was fabulous!).

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Archive Post: Elizabeth I exhibit opening at Greenwich next year

To commemorate the 400th anniversary of the death of Elizabeth, an exhibit will go on display at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, on the site of the old Greenwich Palace where Elizabeth was born. Included in the exhibit is the amazing ring with the miniatures of Elizabeth and Anne Boleyn. Here’s a link to an article on the exhibit and ring at The Guardian.

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Archive News: Grave of Arthur Tudor Found

Two articles of a recent find from Worcester Cathedral: from The Telegraph in the UK and from Yahoo! News (original link expired). Scientists hope the find will help solve the mystery of the “sweating sickness” which is thought to have claimed Arthur’s life.

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Archive Post: Death of the Queen Mother

Many condolences to the Royal Family and the British people on the death of the Queen Mother. She was much loved all over the world and we share your grief.

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Archive News: Margaret Tudor’s marriage anniversary

Here’s a little snippet about an exhibit that will be on display at Stirling Castle of the wedding of Margaret Tudor and James IV of Scotland :

No Expense Spared For Royal Wedding

Research by historians for a new exhibition to be held later this year at Stirling castle, has shown that the wedding of Margaret Tudor (sister of King Henry VIII of England) and King James IV of Scotland cost in the region of £500,000 at today’s prices. Margaret’s dress of white damask and flowered with gold and bordered with red velvet would have cost nearly £100,000. After the marriage the guests were treated to a 15-course banquet. The marriage was to set the seal on the “Treaty of Everlasting Friendship” between Scotland and England, signed in 1502. In 1513, James IV was killed at the battle of Flodden, in the English county of Northumberland. But it was as a consequence of the marriage that the Union of the Crowns was to take place in 1603. The exhibition at Stirling will run from March 20 to May 20.

Thanks to Wendy for passing this along!

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Archive Post: September 11, 2001

Hello all. First off, I would like to thank all my international friends for their support during the past few days. I can’t begin to tell you how much it means to us here in the States. It should also be noted that while this attack happened on American soil, there are many people from many nations who are lost or dead from the events of Septmeber 11. It was, after all, the WORLD Trade Center that was destroyed.

On a much more mundane front, I still don’t have my computer back from the second trip to the shop. I’ve just copied the files that I want to update down to the computer I’m borrowing, so I can continue to post pen pal messages. I’ll still make a couple of small updates and corrections to a couple of other pages. The files I was actually working on are still on the old computer though because I didn’t bother to copy them off, thinking that this would be a quick little adjustment. HA! They had to order a part, which they did after it had already been in for almost two weeks. And of course, when all the planes were grounded after the 11th, there was a big disruption of mail and freight service. So, it’s hard to know when I’ll get my machine back!

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Archive Post: Move to the new domain name

Welcome to the new home! Most of the stuff is in the same place from the old site, but there have been some changes. The chronologies and glossaries have moved to separate directories, and some of the files have moved into their own directories. Also, there are a couple of images from the old site that aren’t here right now, mainly because they are going to be replaced. I can’t remember any specifics, but I know there are a couple.

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Archive Post: January 2000

Sorry there haven’t been a lot of updates here lately. It’s my same old excuse: life just keeps getting in the way. First it was work, then it was illness, and now it’s work again. At least I’ve managed (so far) to avoid the flu bug that’s been going around!

Some good news though: I’m going back to England this year! I’m also going to be visiting North Wales and Edinburgh, Scotland. Hopefully I’ll get lots of good pictures of Tudor associated places to add here this summer!

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Archive Post: August 1999 News

Book news: Someone from the mailing list passed along info on a new book about Hans Holbein. It is only for sale in the UK at this time. It’s title is Hans Holbein and the author is Stephanie Buck. The best part is that it sells for just under £10!

Also, Retha Warnike who wrote The Rise and Fall of Anne Boleyn has a book about Anne of Cleves coming out next February. The official title is: The Marrying of Anne of Cleves : Royal Protocol in Early Modern England

Additional book news: There is a new book on Katherine Parr called Kateryn Parr : The Making of a Queen (Women and Gender in Early Modern England, 1500-1750) by Susan E. James. Unfortunately, it lists for about US$85.

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Archive Post: June 1999 News

Tudor trash is an archaeologist’s treasure

Excavations in London’s Southwark district produce some interesting finds, including a banana peel that predates when the fruit was thought to have been introduced to England. Thanks to Rachel for passing this info along!
Article about excavation from Heritage Matters Magazine
Article from the Museum of London
Article about a Tudor banana also from the Museum of London

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Archive News: Mystery Lady May Be Queen

Mystery Lady May Be Queen
© Herald Sun
October 22, 1998

DNA tests by Melbourne scientists on a tiny tuft of red hair could unlock the secret of a 450 year old painting believed to be of Queen Elizabeth I, when she was nine. Geneticists at Monash University are analysing the hair, plucked from the original frame of the historic 1542 painting ‘Portrait of a Lady’, by renowned 16th century artist Hans Holbein. If the tests prove the hair is from a woman it could help confirm the identity of the woman in the picture as the young Princess Elizabeth, daughter of Henry VIII and future Queen of England.

The news coincides with the release of a major film on the life of the Tudor monarch, Elizabeth, starring Cate Blanchett.

It was Melbourne art historian and researcher Graeme Cameron who found the tiny strand of hair wedged in a crack in the painting’s elaborate original frame. “I went to brush it off but something made me stop and look at it a bit more closely” he said.

Mr Cameron was struck by the hairs age and the fact it was red – the colour of the then Princess Elizabeth’s hair. He said it was possible the hair could have come form either King Henry VIII himself or the artist Holbein, both of whom had red hair. “The hairs are quite ancient and shrivelled” he said. “Whoever it came from, it’s just amazing to think that it could have been there for that long”.

Mr Cameron who has been researching the painting for 20 years said the portrait had immense historical significance. “The Holbein portrait is an historical icon in its own right and represents the earliest image of Elizabeth I in existence” he said.

“It was potentially going to play a vital role in the politics of the day as a marriage portrait to secure an alliance between the English House of Tudor and the Scottish throne”.

Mr Cameron believes the artist painted the young Elizabeth to look much more mature and wiser than her years to increase her attractiveness to her potential suitor. The painting was sent to Scotland with Sir Lionel Duckett, one of the King’s advisers, but failed to win an alliance. It remained in the Duckett family for 300 years, largely forgotten until it was found in a private collection in 1952. The portrait is now owned by a private trust on the Isle of Man and is being restored.

Mr Cameron said the DNA test is just one of a battery of scientific tests being used to add further proof of the painting’s identity. If the DNA analysis reveals the hair to be female, he hopes to compare the genetic code with DNA samples from descendants of the Tudors.

Thanks to Jodie for snail-mailing this to me from down under!

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