Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for June 2022

Sorry this is a little late this month! As I mentioned on the Picture of the Week post, last weekend I was finishing up moving across town and then I was pretty exhausted (pro tip – don’t move in 100°F heat) but had to go back to work right away since our summer research programs started on Wednesday. Not a very restful start to the summer around here!

Books

Elizabeth I’s Final Years: Her Favourites and Her Fighting Men by Robert Stedall got past me with its UK release last month, has a US release at the end of this month (or early in July… I have two different dates, but I decided to go ahead and post it now):

Next up, Gloriana: Elizabeth I and the Art of Queenship by Linda Collins and Siobhan Clarke will be out in the middle of the month in the UK and on Kindle in the US (I didn’t see a release date for a US dead-tree version, but will update if I find one):

And finally, Estelle Paranque’s latest work, Blood, Fire and Gold: The Story of Elizabeth I and Catherine de Medici will be out at the end of the month in the UK and later this year in the US:

Continuing Exhibitions

The Tudors: Passion, Power, and Politics is now on display at the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool. The exhibition opened on May 21, 2022 and runs through August 29, 2022. The exhibit will display, for the first time in 20 years, the Westminster Tournament Roll that features John Blanke (read more in this article from The Guardian).

To celebrate the 500th anniversary of Anne Boleyn’s first recorded appearance at Court, her childhood home of Hever Castle is putting on the exhibition Becoming Anne: Connections, Culture, Court. The exhibition opened on March 4 and runs through November and is included with admission to the castle.

One Comment:

  1. I’ll put in a plug for Jennifer Morag Henderson’s Daughters of the North, a double study of Jean Gordon, Bothwell’s first wife, and Mary Queen of Scots, who displaced her. Well-researched and a refreshingly cold-eyed assessment of Mary’s behavior as a queen and politician, without the usual sentimental gloss.

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