Picture of the Week #372

Palmer’s house at Mary Arden’s Farm, Wilmcote (near Stratford-upon-Avon). Photo May 2015.

This month’s theme will start a few months of things related to Shakespeare! March will start things off with Mary Arden’s Farm, the childhood home of Shakespeare’s mother. The building above was discovered to actually be Palmer’s Farmhouse, but the Arden’s home is on the property too and will be featured later this month.

Upcoming Books and Events for March 2016

Even with an extra day in February this year, it seemed to fly by!

Books

One book that I missed in last month’s round-up that came out in early February is John Dudley – The Life of Lady Jane Grey’s Father-in-Law by Christine Hartweg, who runs the great All Things Robert Dudley site.

In new books this month, first up is Amy License’s latest, Red Roses: Blanche of Gaunt to Margaret Beaufort. It is out March 7 in the UK and the US Kindle edition is out March 15.

Next up is So Great a Prince: England in 1509 by Lauren Johnson, which is out in the UK on March 10 (I don’t have info on a US release at this point). The book takes a look at England at the time of the death of Henry VII and the accession of the 17-year-old Henry VIII.

And finally for this month – Sarah Morris and Natalie Grueninger have teamed up again for In the Footsteps of the Six Wives of Henry VIII: The visitor’s companion to the palaces, castles & houses associated with Henry VIII’s iconic queens, a sequel of sorts to their previous collaboration In the Footsteps of Anne Boleyn. The book is out March 15 in the UK and May 19 the US. Stay tuned for a post here on TudorHistory.org as part of Sarah and Natalie’s blog tour for the book!

Continuing Exhibitions

I can’t hope to find all of the Shakespeare exhibitions being put on this year, so I’m mainly trying to get the big ones and a few I come across that are outside the UK. If you’re in the UK and want to keep up with special events occurring throughout the year, check out Shakespeare400.

Shakespeare Documented – Celebrating 400 years of William Shakespeare with an online exhibition documenting Shakespeare in his own time. The partners in this exhibition include The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford, The British Library, The Folger Shakespeare Library, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and The National Archives. The exhibition will continue to expand throughout the year.

Shakespeare, Life of an Icon opened January 20 at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC and will run through March 27. This is the first of three exhibitions they will put on, in addition to other events, during their year-long Wonder of Will celebrations.

By me William Shakespeare: A Life in Writing opened at the National Archives on February 3 and will run through May 29 and features Shakespeare’s will as the centerpiece of the exhibition.

Windsor Castle will host Shakespeare in the Royal Library from February 13 through January 1, 2017 and includes works of Shakespeare collected by the royal family, accounts of performances at Windsor Castle, and art by members of the royal family inspired by Shakespeare’s plays.

The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin launched Shakespeare in Print and Performance on December 21, 2015 and it will run through May 29, 2016.

Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee opened January 18 and will run through July 29, 2016 at the Royal College of Physicians in London.

Sunday Short Takes

The Sunday Short Takes have accidentally become a monthly thing of late, but that’s just the way it has worked out between lack of enough stories on a weekly basis and my recent work schedule. But I actually had a whole weekend and enough stories today, so here we go!

* The March issue of BBC History Magazine is a Tudor special – it’s on my iPad now just waiting for me to find enough time to read it!

* Getting Clean, the Tudor WayA historian attempts to follow Tudor hygiene with a daily regime of linen underwear. – Excerpted from How to Be a Tudor by Ruth Goodman – currently on my Audible wishlist 🙂

* Researchers seek Henry VII’s Pembroke Castle birthplaceDetails of the exact location of Henry VII’s birthplace at Pembroke Castle could be uncovered by researchers using geophysical techniques. – I’ll keep an eye out for their results!

* It’s curtain-up for £750m apartment block built on Shakespearean theatre – Wanna live above the remains of The Curtain? Thankfully you won’t have to live there to visit the remains though, since the plans include the development of a heritage center.

Picture of the Week #371

The Poorhouse of Framlingham Castle. Photo May 2015.

The poorhouse buildings date from the 17th and 18th century and are built on the site of the medieval great hall. Some parts of the great hall were incorporated into the poorhouse and can be seen in the foreground of this picture. The fireplace and chimney to the far right in the photo date from the 16th century.

Picture of the Week #368

Framlingham Castle. Photo May 2015

Later this month, Mary Tudor (daughter of Henry VIII) will have her 500th birthday so I chose Framlingham Castle for the theme of the February Pictures of the Month. The castle was where Mary rallied her troops to her cause as she asserted her claim to the throne after the death of her brother Edward VI.

Upcoming Books and Events for February 2016

Books

Ruth Goodman’s How to Be a Tudor: A Dawn-to-Dusk Guide to Everyday Life was released in early November 2015 in the UK and will be out February 15 in the US:

And Amy Licence’s Edward IV & Elizabeth Woodville: A True Romance was released in January in the US and will be out February 15 in the UK:

New Exhibitions

I can’t hope to find all of the Shakespeare exhibitions being put on this year, so I’m mainly trying to get the big ones and a few I come across that are outside the UK. If you’re in the UK and want to keep up with special events occurring throughout the year, check out Shakespeare400.


Celebrating 400 years of William Shakespeare with an online exhibition documenting Shakespeare in his own time.
The partners in this exhibition include The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford, The British Library, The Folger Shakespeare Library, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and The National Archives. The exhibition will continue to expand throughout the year.

Shakespeare, Life of an Icon opened January 20 at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC and will run through March 27. This is the first of three exhibitions they will put on, in addition to other events, during their year-long Wonder of Will celebrations.

By me William Shakespeare: A Life in Writing opens at the National Archives on February 3 and will run through May 29 and features Shakespeare’s will as the centerpiece of the exhibition.

Windsor Castle will host Shakespeare in the Royal Library from February 13 through January 1, 2017 and includes works of Shakespeare collected by the royal family, accounts of performances at Windsor Castle, and art by members of the royal family inspired by Shakespeare’s plays.

Continuing Exhibitions

The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin launched Shakespeare in Print and Performance on December 21, 2015 and it will run through May 29, 2016.

Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee opened January 18 and will run through July 29, 2016 at the Royal College of Physicians in London.

Sunday Short Takes

I had no intention of waiting a whole month into the new year to finally post a Sunday Short Takes, but that’s just kind of how things worked out! So here’s a round-up of Tudor history-related news that caught my eye from the very end of 2015 and the first month of 2016:

* Archaeologists believe Thames gold hoard may have come from Tudor hatExperts say 12 tiny pieces of gold recovered from the banks of the Thames may have come from a hat blown off the head of a high-status Tudor figure

* Explore Shakespeare’s first folio online – Couldn’t resist linking to this since it is from my university! Also, you can download hi-res versions of each of the pages from the digitized version.

* Catholic worship returns to Henry VIII’s chapel for first time since 16th CenturyCardinal Vincent Nichols will join the Bishop of London, the Rt Rev Richard Charters, for a unique service of vespers as part of an initiative to celebrate the chapel’s musical heritage spanning both Catholic and protestant reigns.

* Heritage Lottery funding for IHR’s ‘Layers of London’ projectThe Institute of Historical Research has been awarded a first-stage pass and development funding of £103,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund for a new interactive online resource tracing London’s history from the Roman period to the present day.

* Tudor stained glass portrait of young Henry VIII lovingly restored – Work that I previously mentioned here continues to preserve and restore the Tudor stained glass at The Vyne.

Picture of the Week #367

The grave of Catherine of Aragon at Peterborough Cathedral. Photo May 2016.

Rounding out Peterborough Cathedral month of the Picture of the Week, is, of course, the grave of Catherine of Aragon. When I visited in May of last year it was the cap of a 17-year journey of visiting all of the graves of the wives of Henry VIII. Friday marks the 480th anniversary of her burial at the Cathedral (which was actually an abbey at the time) and as you can see in the photos, people routinely leave pomegranates and other mementos at the gravesite.

Picture of the Week #366

South Aisle of Peterborough Cathedral. Photo May 2015.

Peterborough is probably best known among Tudor history fans as the burial place of Catherine of Aragon, but it was also the original burial place of Mary Queen of Scots after her execution at nearby Fotheringhay Castle. Mary’s body was later moved to Westminster Abbey after her son inherited the English throne as James I. The Scottish flags in the photo above are across the aisle from the area that is now marked as Mary’s former burial spot.

Picture of the Week #364

West front of Peterborough Cathedral. Photo May 2015.

I’m planning to do a monthly theme with the Pictures of the Week this year and since Catherine of Aragon was buried in Peterborough in January that’s going to be the first theme for 2016.

Upcoming Books and Events for January 2016

Happy New Year! I’ll have a proper post later with a wrap-up of last year and some things I want to accomplish in 2016 but for now – on to the round-up for January!

Books

I’ll start out with a couple of books that have already been released in the UK and will be out later in January in the US:

Elizabeth Norton’s The Temptation of Elizabeth Tudor: Elizabeth I, Thomas Seymour, and the Making of a Virgin Queen is out January 4 in the US –

Alison Weir’s latest Tudor biography is The Lost Tudor Princess: The Life of Margaret Douglas Countess of Lennox will be released January 12 in the US –

And in new books this month, Amy Licence’s Edward IV & Elizabeth Woodville: A True Romance will be released January 19 in the US and February 15 in the UK –

Events

Peterborough Cathedral’s annual Katharine of Aragon Festival will be January 28 to 31 this year. I was so happy to finally get a chance to visit Peterborough in 2015 and maybe some year I’ll find myself there at the end of January so I can visit during the festival.

New Exhibitions

Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee opens January 18 and will run through July 29, 2016 at the Royal College of Physicians in London.

From the website:

Our exhibition explores Dee through his personal library. On display for the first time are Dee’s mathematical, astronomical and alchemical texts, many elaborately annotated and illustrated by Dee’s own hand. Now held in the collections of the Royal College of Physicians, they reveal tantalising glimpses into the ‘conjuror’s mind’.

Continuing Exhibitions

The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin launched Shakespeare in Print and Performance on December 21, 2015 and it will run through May 29, 2016.

Picture of the Week #362

The Nutcracker Christmas Shop, Stratford-upon-Avon. Photo May 2015.

I was trying to think of something seasonally-appropriate to post today and then I remembered the Christmas store I saw in Stratford! (The photo above was taken out of the window of the Shakespeare Birthplace.)

Sunday Short Takes

Short round-up this week, but I wanted to get one more in before the Solstice, Festivus, and Christmas so I could wish everyone celebrating a “Happy Holidays”!

One story lit up my alerts more than anything else this week:

* The Lost Tiltyard TowerArchaeologists at Hampton Court Palace have uncovered the remains of one of the palace’s famous five lost Tiltyard Towers. The discovery of this green-glazed tile floor has solved a three-hundred-year-old mystery. Built at the height of King Henry VIII’s reign in the 1530s, the Tiltyard Towers once stood within the walled Tiltyard, where the Tudor monarchs held jousts and tournaments.

In other news:

* Lady Jane Grey: why do we want to believe the myth?The image of Lady Jane Grey, the abused child-woman and nine days queen, is encapsulated in a fraud. Why are we so keen to believe in an innocent, virginal Jane, asks Leanda de Lisle…

* First glimpse of lost library of Elizabethan polymath John DeeWhere to start with the legend and life of Dr Dee? Born on 13 July 1527, John Dee became one of the greatest scholars of the age, and a philosopher and courtier to Queen Elizabeth I.

Sunday Short Takes

Even though I had a bunch of articles last weekend, I didn’t get around to doing a round-up post. So, here’s an extra big one!

Lots of Shakespeare news in the past couple of weeks, which I’m sure is just the beginning of the Bard frenzy we’ll see in the next few months leading up to the 400th anniversary of his death in April 2016.

First up – several articles about the recent discoveries in the dig at New Place in Stratford (I admit, I tried to sneak a peek when I was in the town in May but I couldn’t see much):

* Shakespeare’s “kitchen” discovered during archaeological dig (Shakespeare Birthplace Trust)

* Shakespeare’s kitchen discovered in Stratford-upon-Avon dig (BBC)

Want to try your hand at helping to transcribe Shakespearean-era documents?

* Where there’s a quill … help to unpick manuscripts from the days of Shakespeare – article from The Guardian about the project. This is another example of my worlds colliding – this is built on the Zooniverse platform, which started as a citizen science program that I know a lot of scientists who have worked on with everyday people.

* Shakespeare’s World – link to the project itself

And speaking of Shakespearean documents, they will feature in some upcoming exhibitions in 2016:

* William Shakespeare’s last will and testament among key documents going on public show at Somerset House

* Shakespeare was ‘celebrity, matchmaker and theatre thief’, papers reveal

* William Shakespeare’s tryst with a female fanA diary entry, never before seen by the public, will be on display at the British Library next year

And in other news:

* Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with “best ever”, “unrestricted” views of ship – If you were planning to visit the Mary Rose Museum, you’ll have to wait until the summer of 2016, but it sounds like it will definitely we worth the wait!

* The annual TannerRitchie Publishing Holiday Sale is on, a great opportunity to stock up on digital versions of primary sources.

And finally:

* How to Make a Tudor Christmas Decoration, courtesy of English Heritage and Kenilworth Castle