Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for November 2016

Books

A few books that have already been released in the UK will be out in the US this month –

First up is The Tudors in 100 Objects by John Matusiak which was released August 1 in the UK and will be out in hardback in the US at the beginning of November:

And Sarah Gristwood’s Game of Queens: The Women Who Made Sixteenth Century Europe which was released last month in the UK and at the end of this month in the US.

And in new books this month, Crown of Blood: The Deadly Inheritance of Lady Jane Grey by Nicola Tallis is out November 3 in the UK and will be out December 6 in the US.

Events

The second of this fall’s BBC History Magazine’s History Weekends is in York from November 18th to 20th.

Continuing Exhibitions

Ending soon – Will & Jane opened on August 6 and will run through November 6 and is the final of three exhibitions at the Folger Shakespeare Library, in addition to other events, during their year-long Wonder of Will celebrations.

Windsor Castle will host Shakespeare in the Royal Library from February 13 through January 1, 2017 and includes works of Shakespeare collected by the royal family, accounts of performances at Windsor Castle, and art by members of the royal family inspired by Shakespeare’s plays.

Shakespeare Documented – Celebrating 400 years of William Shakespeare with an online exhibition documenting Shakespeare in his own time. The partners in this exhibition include The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford, The British Library, The Folger Shakespeare Library, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and The National Archives. The exhibition will continue to expand throughout the year.

Picture of the Week #413

Portrait of Edward VI, attributed to William Scots c. 1550, hanging at Hampton Court Palace. Photo May 2015.

I haven’t done a whole lot of portraits as Pictures of the Week yet, but I got a number of decent photos of paintings at Hampton Court Palace last year so I’m going to start using some going forward. This one is of the birthday boy, Edward VI, born 479 years ago today!

Picture of the Week #412

Wine Fountain and Hampton Court Palace. Photo May 2015.

For October I’ll be featuring Hampton Court Palace in honor of the birth of Edward VI and the death of Jane Seymour. The wine fountain was one of several things that had changed since my visits in 1998 and 2000 which gave me a lot of new things to take pictures of (and boy did I take a lot of photos there last year…).

Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for October 2016

Books

Starting out with a number of books that slipped past me in the previous months…

First up is The Tudors in 100 Objects by John Matusiak which was released August 1 in the UK and will be out in hardback in the US at the beginning of November:

And Sean Cunningham’s Prince Arthur: The Tudor King Who Never Was came out in the US earlier than I expected, so it is now available!

One that I missed in August that is out in the UK and will be out October 9 in the US is Henry VII’s New Men and the Making of Tudor England by Steven Gunn. Unfortunately this one is ‘academically priced’ (i.e. expensive!) so I’ll have to snag it from the university library at some point.

Melanie Clegg’s Scourge of Henry VIII: The Life of Marie de Guise will be out this month in the US after a release in August in the UK.

In new books this month, Elizabeth Norton’s latest Tudor work, The Lives of Tudor Women is out the first week in October in the UK and will be out next year in the US.

And Catherine of Aragon: An Intimate Life of Henry VIII’s True Wife by Amy Licence is out mid-month in the UK and next spring in the US.

And finally, Sarah Gristwood’s Game of Queens: The Women Who Made Sixteenth Century Europe is out this week in the UK and next month in the US.

Events

The BBC History Magazine’s History Weekends return this fall with one in Winchester from October 7th to 9th and another in York from November 18th to 20th.

Continuing Exhibitions

Will & Jane opened on August 6 and will run through November 6 and is the final of three exhibitions at the Folger Shakespeare Library, in addition to other events, during their year-long Wonder of Will celebrations.

Windsor Castle will host Shakespeare in the Royal Library from February 13 through January 1, 2017 and includes works of Shakespeare collected by the royal family, accounts of performances at Windsor Castle, and art by members of the royal family inspired by Shakespeare’s plays.

Shakespeare Documented – Celebrating 400 years of William Shakespeare with an online exhibition documenting Shakespeare in his own time. The partners in this exhibition include The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford, The British Library, The Folger Shakespeare Library, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and The National Archives. The exhibition will continue to expand throughout the year.

Sunday Short Takes

Good grief, I didn’t expect a month to go by before I got a chance to do one of these again… To say that things have been busy lately would be a wild understatement. The good news is that I’ve earned a fair amount of comp time but the bad news is that I have no idea when I will ever be able to use it!

But enough whinging from me – on to the news round-up!

* The Tudor London Tube Map – This one has already been going around social media for a while now, but it was so clever (and useful for planning a Tudor-themed trip to London) that I had to post it.

* Lost in the Great Fire: which London buildings disappeared in the 1666 blaze? – A look at some of the reasons that many Tudor (and earlier) buildings of London aren’t around to see anymore.

* Bosworth: the dawn of the TudorsFrom childhood imprisonment in Brittany to the violent execution of Richard III in a Leicestershire field, Henry Tudor’s passage to the throne was lengthy and labyrinthine. Chris Skidmore charts the origins of the Tudor dynasty…

* Cleaning This Portrait Could Change the Way Historians See ShakespeareThe only portrait of the Bard made while he was alive might be getting touch-ups

* Revealed: 500-year-old kiln could shed light on the construction of Henry VIII’s Tudor palace in EssexResearchers believe kiln was used when building Palace of Beaulieu

* Virtual Tudors – New website with 3D models of artifacts and more from the wreck of the Mary Rose

Upcoming Tudor History event in Bath

It’s been ages since I’ve done a standalone post about an upcoming event after I started doing the monthly round-ups, but I wanted to get this one that takes place at the end of September out there in time for anyone in the area to have a chance to attend. (Updated to add – big thanks to J. Stephan Edwards of Some Grey Matter for the info on this talk!)


TWILIGHT TALK: Tudor Shirts and Blackwork Decoration

29th September 2016 at 6:00pm at the Fashion Museum, Bath

From the website:

Beneath their ornate doublets and richly decorated robes Tudor men and women of fashion chose to wear fine linen shirts, shifts, and smocks, frequently decorated with beautiful blackwork embroidery. Dr Susan North of the Victoria and Albert Museum will explore this hidden area of dress history, drawing on portraits of the time, as well as rare surviving garments from the time of Queen Elizabeth I.

Dr Susan North, Victoria and Albert Museum is senior curator in the Furniture, Fashion and Textiles Collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, and a leading expert on dress of the 16th century.

Click the link above for information on tickets!

Picture of the Week #408

Entrance to Hall’s Croft, Stratford-upon-Avon. Photo May 2015.

This month we’re going back to Stratford and featuring Hall’s Croft, one of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust properties. Since this property is set a little away from the busiest tourist area of the town, it’s a little quieter and for that reason alone worth seeking out! But it’s also a great place to visit, with period furniture throughout and a lovely back garden.

Hall’s Croft was the first home of Shakespeare’s daughter Susannah and her husband Dr. John Hall after they were married, but they later moved to New Place after her father’s death.

Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for September 2016

New books

One book I missed from last month is Wendy J. Dunn’s Falling Pomegranate Seeds, a novel about Katherine of Aragon:

And out at the end of this month in the UK is Anne Boleyn in London by Lissa Chapman, which will be out early next year in the US:

Events

The BBC History Magazine’s History Weekends return this fall with one in Winchester from October 7th to 9th and another in York from November 18th to 20th.

Exhibitions Ending This Month

Oxford’s Bodleian Library will run Shakespeare’s Dead from April 22 to September 4. This exhibition will examine the theme of Death in Shakespeare’s works. It “provides a unique take on the subject by exploring how Shakespeare used the anticipation of death, the moment of death and mourning the dead as contexts to bring characters to life. … Shakespeare’s Dead also looks at last words spoken, funerals and mourning as well as life after death, including ghosts and characters who come back to life.”

The British Library’s Shakespeare in Ten Acts opened April 15 and will run through September 6. The exhibition is a “Journey through 400 years of history – from the first productions of Hamlet and The Tempest – to understand how Shakespeare’s plays have been transformed for new generations of theatre-goers.”

The Visions of Utopia display opened in June in the Treasures of the British Library and will run through September 18, 2016.

Continuing Exhibitions

Windsor Castle will host Shakespeare in the Royal Library from February 13 through January 1, 2017 and includes works of Shakespeare collected by the royal family, accounts of performances at Windsor Castle, and art by members of the royal family inspired by Shakespeare’s plays.

Shakespeare Documented – Celebrating 400 years of William Shakespeare with an online exhibition documenting Shakespeare in his own time. The partners in this exhibition include The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford, The British Library, The Folger Shakespeare Library, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and The National Archives. The exhibition will continue to expand throughout the year.

Picture of the Week #406

The Battlefield in 1485. Photo May 2015.

The text on the sign reads:

The Battlefield in 1485

The trees in the modern landscape make the lie of the land quite hard to see. The medieval landscape was more or less devoid of trees as a system of open field farming prevailed. This method was widespread and created a rather barren landscape. From this point in 1485 you would be able to see Dadlington windmill and most of Norfolk’s army throughout the battle. You would also be able to hear the roar of the guns and the screams of the dying.

Sunday Short Takes

Big story from a couple of weeks ago!

* Elizabeth I Armada portrait saved with help of 8,000 donorsA portrait of Elizabeth I has become public property, after an appeal helped raise £10.3m to buy it.

And a few other articles of interest:

* In Praise of the Go-BetweenArchives are one thing, the public another and connecting the two is one of a historian’s hardest challenges, as Suzannah Lipscomb knows from experience.

* ‘Irreplaceable’ Tudor window ‘stolen to order’ from chapelA stained glass window taken from a Tudor church was “stolen to order”, experts believe.

* Dundee student solves historic mystery of Lord DarnleyEmma Price, 23, has recreated the face of Henry Stuart, a.k.a. Lord Darnley, who was the second husband of Mary, Queen of Scots, as part of her MSc Forensic Art and Facial Identification course at DJCAD.

* Shakespeare’s New Place to re-open in Stratford-on-AvonA splendid new oak and bronze gateway will open on the original threshold of Shakespeare’s New Place, inviting visitors to walk in the playwright’s footsteps, explore a dramatic new landscape and exhibition, and meet the man behind the famous works this weekend.

Picture of the Week #405

Display of the ‘Crown in the Hawthorn Bush’ story from the end of the battle, at the Bosworth Battlefield Heritage Centre.

Legend has it that Lord Stanley found the circlet that Richard III had worn into battle in a hawthorn bush and presented it to Henry at the end of the battle.

Picture of the Week #403

Inscription on the Bosworth Battlefield memorial sundial. Photo May 2015.

On to August and a new theme for this month’s pictures – the Bosworth Battlefield Heritage Centre and Country Park, in honor of the anniversary of the battle on August 22nd.