Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for July 2016

New Books

First up is J. Stephan Edwards with The Lady Jane Grey’s Prayer Book: British Library Harley Manuscript 2342, Fully Illustrated and Transcribed which will be released July 15. Pre-orders are available directly through the publisher. More information is available at the author’s website.

And the other new book this month is Sean Cunningham’s Prince Arthur: The Tudor King Who Never Was which will be released July 15 in the UK and later in the fall in the US.

Other Books

Several books that have been previously released in the UK will be released in July in the US —

Insurrection: Henry VIII, Thomas Cromwell and the Pilgrimage of Grace by Susan Loughlin was released July 1 in the US after an April release in the UK:

Tracy Borman’s Private Lives of the Tudors came out in May in the UK and will be released July 19 in the US:

And one I missed from last month – an academic work edited by Sarah Duncan and Valerie Schutte titled The Birth of a Queen: Essays on the Quincentenary of Mary I:

Events

The Mary Rose Museum will be reopening on July 20 and for the first time visitors will get an unobstructed view of the ship.

New Exhibitions

The Visions of Utopia display opened in June in the Treasures of the British Library and will run through September 18, 2016.

Visit our free temporary display and discover one of the most influential books in Western literature – Thomas More’s Utopia. Marking the 500th anniversary of its publication, this unique display will look at the context in which More wrote the original Utopia and at different visions and meanings of Utopia up to the present day. Written during the reign of Henry VIII, the book was an instant best seller and has continued to inspire readers, writers and thinkers throughout the centuries.

See close up one of the world’s only surviving original editions of Utopia, an original diplomatic letter to Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, signed by More and others and many other precious items.

Exhibitions ending this month

America’s Shakespeare opened on April 7 and will run through July 24 and is the second of three exhibitions they will put on, in addition to other events, during their year-long Wonder of Will celebrations.

Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee opened January 18 and will run through July 29, 2016 at the Royal College of Physicians in London.

Continuing Exhibitions

The British Library’s Shakespeare in Ten Acts opened April 15 and will run through September 6. The exhibition is a “Journey through 400 years of history – from the first productions of Hamlet and The Tempest – to understand how Shakespeare’s plays have been transformed for new generations of theatre-goers.”

Oxford’s Bodleian Library will run Shakespeare’s Dead from April 22 to September 4. This exhibition will examine the theme of Death in Shakespeare’s works. It “provides a unique take on the subject by exploring how Shakespeare used the anticipation of death, the moment of death and mourning the dead as contexts to bring characters to life. … Shakespeare’s Dead also looks at last words spoken, funerals and mourning as well as life after death, including ghosts and characters who come back to life.”

Windsor Castle will host Shakespeare in the Royal Library from February 13 through January 1, 2017 and includes works of Shakespeare collected by the royal family, accounts of performances at Windsor Castle, and art by members of the royal family inspired by Shakespeare’s plays.

Shakespeare Documented – Celebrating 400 years of William Shakespeare with an online exhibition documenting Shakespeare in his own time. The partners in this exhibition include The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford, The British Library, The Folger Shakespeare Library, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and The National Archives. The exhibition will continue to expand throughout the year.

Sunday Short Takes

Sorry I’ve gotten so far behind again… Some of this is kind of old news now, but still worthwhile to link to.

* Art Fund and Royal Museums Greenwich launch appeal to save Armada Portrait of Elizabeth I
& Britain has two months to raise £10m to save most famous Armada portrait of Elizabeth IThe portrait, one of the most famous in existence, has been privately held by the Tyrwhitt-Drake family for generations, and is now up for sale

* Sad news – Tudor historian David Loades passed away last month. I first saw it mentioned in the Society of Antiquaries newsletter from May 23.

* Revealed: the monastic treasures Henry VIII’s men missedA new museum at the ruins of Rievaulx Abbey in North Yorkshire offers glimpses of the life Henry VIII’s commissioners attempted to wipe out: from gold coins, as testament to the Cistercian house’s once great wealth, to religious carvings, monastic drinking vessels and 11th century chess pieces.

* Henry VIII returns home to Hampton Court PalaceThis portrait of Henry, painted during the final years of his reign, is one of the most important in existence, and one of the few surviving painted during the King’s lifetime. It is based on a likeness produced in the workshop of Hans Holbein, Henry’s court artist and one of the greatest of all portrait painters. While several other versions of this portrait survive, this copy – in the collection of Castle Howard for over 300 years – is considered to be among the finest.

* From The Society of Antiquaries – UNLOCKING OUR COLLECTIONS: Portrait of Mary IOur guest curator, Diana Scarisbrick, FSA, is a historian specializing in jewelry and engraved gems, and is the author of several books, including Rings: Jewelry of Power, Love and Loyalty and Tudor and Jacobean Jewellery, 1508-1625. Below, she explains the significance and symbolism of the jewels in our portrait of Mary I.

* Historic England is looking for the public’s help to Enrich the List99% of people in England live within a mile of a listed building or place. We invite you to share your knowledge and pictures of listed places with us, so we can record important facts, and even unlock the secrets of some places.

And finally –

* FutureLearn Course: A History of Royal Food and Feasting – More information here: A History of Royal Food and Feasting

Upcoming Books and Continuing Exhibitions for June 2016

New Books

The Tudor Brandons: Mary and Charles – Henry VIII’s Nearest & Dearest by Sarah-Beth Watkins is due out June 1 in the UK and June 24 in the US:

And one new release I missed from last month:

Terry Breveton’s Henry VII: The Maligned Tudor King was released May 15 in the UK and will be out at the end of July in the US (possibly with the alternate title Henry VII: Destiny’s King):

And one book that came out in the UK a few months ago and now out in the US – Amy Licence’s Red Roses: Blanche of Gaunt to Margaret Beaufort:

There were a few other books I’ve been tracking that now have confusing (or non-existent) release dates that I decided to just leave off and will post when I get more definitive information.

Continuing Exhibitions

America’s Shakespeare opened on April 7 and will run through July 24 and is the second of three exhibitions they will put on, in addition to other events, during their year-long Wonder of Will celebrations.

The British Library’s Shakespeare in Ten Acts opened April 15 and will run through September 6. The exhibition is a “Journey through 400 years of history – from the first productions of Hamlet and The Tempest – to understand how Shakespeare’s plays have been transformed for new generations of theatre-goers.”

Oxford’s Bodleian Library will run Shakespeare’s Dead from April 22 to September 4. This exhibition will examine the theme of Death in Shakespeare’s works. It “provides a unique take on the subject by exploring how Shakespeare used the anticipation of death, the moment of death and mourning the dead as contexts to bring characters to life. … Shakespeare’s Dead also looks at last words spoken, funerals and mourning as well as life after death, including ghosts and characters who come back to life.”

Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee opened January 18 and will run through July 29, 2016 at the Royal College of Physicians in London.

Windsor Castle will host Shakespeare in the Royal Library from February 13 through January 1, 2017 and includes works of Shakespeare collected by the royal family, accounts of performances at Windsor Castle, and art by members of the royal family inspired by Shakespeare’s plays.

Shakespeare Documented – Celebrating 400 years of William Shakespeare with an online exhibition documenting Shakespeare in his own time. The partners in this exhibition include The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford, The British Library, The Folger Shakespeare Library, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and The National Archives. The exhibition will continue to expand throughout the year.

Sunday Short Takes

A number of big stories lit up my news alerts this week so I guess I couldn’t procrastinate my way though another Sunday without doing a wrap-up! And I’m actually healthy again, which helps a lot. 🙂

This was probably the biggest story that came through:

* Altar cloth kept in rural Herefordshire church confirmed as Tudor cloth linked to Queen Elizabeth I

* And a great video from Historic Royal Palaces – The Bacton Altar Cloth:

Followed by this:

* Archaeologists blow the whistle on Shakespeare’s Curtain Theatre unearthed at ShoreditchA 450-year-old children’s bird whistle is among artefacts unearthed by archaeologists excavating Shakespeare’s historic Curtain Theatre in Shoreditch.

And another interesting video – Excavating and preserving Shakespeare’s Curtain Theatre – The Stage, Shoreditch:

And a few other stories that caught my eye:

* Tapestries back at Oxburgh Hall thanks to digital technology – I visited Oxburgh last year and highly recommend adding it to any Tudor-themed travel itinerary!

* Archaeologists could be close to finding the exact location of Henry VII’s birthplace at Pembroke Castle – Glimpses of what lies beneath the surface of the site were revealed in aerial photographs and are now being investigated

* London Charterhouse set to open to the public for the first timeIn partnership with the Museum of London, the Charterhouse will be creating a new museum within the Tudor mansion, as well as a Learning Centre and an exhibition space which will tell the story of Charterhouse and its role in key moments in English history.

* Tudormania: Why can’t we get over it?Our fixation with the sexy powerplays of the Tudor court shows no signs of fading. What is it about this 16th-century dynasty that still obsesses us?

Picture of the Week #390

The Grave of William Shakespeare, Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon. Photo May 2015.

Next in the Shakespeare-themed months for the Picture of the Week is Holy Trinity Church, where several members of the Shakespeare family are buried as we’ll see over the next few weeks.

Sunday Short Takes

There were a bunch of Shakespeare events last weekend for the 400th anniversary of the Bard’s death (and 452nd anniversary of his birth), and here are a few related articles:

* William Shakespeare, Playwright and Poet, Is Dead at 52 – The New York Times obituary for Shakespeare

* Shakespeare’s ‘original classroom’ revealedThe original classroom where William Shakespeare is believed to have studied and seen his first plays opens to the public for the first time this weekend.

* BBC Shakespeare Lives – The main page for all of the Shakespeare celebrations of the BBC. It looks like at least some (maybe all?) of the videos on this site are viewable outside the UK – yay!

And in other news…

* Princely pleasures at Kenilworth: Robert Dudley’s three-week marriage proposal to Elizabeth I
Described as Elizabeth I’s great love, Robert Dudley came closer than any other suitor to making the queen his wife. Here, historian Elizabeth Goldring explores Dudley’s three-week marriage proposal at Kenilworth – his last-ditch attempt, after nearly 15 years of trying, to win the queen’s hand…

* The men who changed Henry VIII’s underpantsAs Dr Edward Dutton reveals, the Tudor path to power wasn’t making speeches in the Commons; it was changing Henry VIII’s underpants and wiping his bottom…

And finally, a video of a year in the life of the Hampton Court Gardens

Upcoming Books and Events for May 2016

I meant to get this post up several days ago but the virus I mentioned a couple of weeks ago has continued to kick my butt so it took a little longer to get around to it than I had anticipated!

Books

The US release of Sarah Morris and Natalie Grueninger’s In the Footsteps of the Six Wives of Henry VIII will be on May 19, coincidentally the 480th anniversary of Anne Boleyn’s execution. The book was released in the UK in March.

And in the good timing department – releasing today is Charles Brandon – The King’s Man by Sarah Bryson.

John Guy’s latest Tudor work, Elizabeth: The Forgotten Years, which covers the later years of the Queen’s reign, will be released on May 3 in the US and May 5 in the UK.

The first novel in Alison Weir’s Six Tudor Queens series Katherine of Aragon, the True Queen will be released May 5 in the UK and May 31 in the US.

Kristie Dean’s newest book, On the Trail of Richard III will be out on May 5 in the UK and the US edition will be released later in the summer.

Next up is The Reluctant Ambassador: The Life and Times of Sir Thomas Chaloner, a Tudor Diplomat by Dan O’Sullivan, which is out May 15 in the UK and will be out in July in the US.

And finally for this month – The Private Lives of the Tudors by Tracy Borman is out May 19 in the UK and July 12 in the US.

New Event

Alison Weir will give a talk entitled Richard III: The Man and the Myth in conjunction with the Red Rose Chain’s production of Shakespeare’s Richard III at The Avenue Theatre in Ipswich on Saturday May 7 at 6:00 p.m. Click the link for more details!

Continuing Exhibitions

Ending this month:

Westminster Abbey’s 500 Years of Wonder will celebrate the quincentennial of the completion of Henry VII’s Lady Chapel with some special events between April 21st and May 5 including a concert, services, and lectures.

By me William Shakespeare: A Life in Writing opened at the National Archives on February 3 and will run through May 29 and features Shakespeare’s will as the centerpiece of the exhibition.

The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin launched Shakespeare in Print and Performance on December 21, 2015 and it will run through May 29, 2016. (I finally got a chance to go over and see this on my lunch hour a few weeks ago and I’ll have a write-up sometime soon.)

And things you still have a little more time to catch:

America’s Shakespeare opened on April 7 and will run through July 24 and is the second of three exhibitions they will put on, in addition to other events, during their year-long Wonder of Will celebrations.

The British Library’s Shakespeare in Ten Acts opened April 15 and will run through September 6. The exhibition is a “Journey through 400 years of history – from the first productions of Hamlet and The Tempest – to understand how Shakespeare’s plays have been transformed for new generations of theatre-goers.”

Oxford’s Bodleian Library will run Shakespeare’s Dead from April 22 to September 4. This exhibition will examine the theme of Death in Shakespeare’s works. It “provides a unique take on the subject by exploring how Shakespeare used the anticipation of death, the moment of death and mourning the dead as contexts to bring characters to life. … Shakespeare’s Dead also looks at last words spoken, funerals and mourning as well as life after death, including ghosts and characters who come back to life.”

Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee opened January 18 and will run through July 29, 2016 at the Royal College of Physicians in London.

Windsor Castle will host Shakespeare in the Royal Library from February 13 through January 1, 2017 and includes works of Shakespeare collected by the royal family, accounts of performances at Windsor Castle, and art by members of the royal family inspired by Shakespeare’s plays.

Shakespeare Documented – Celebrating 400 years of William Shakespeare with an online exhibition documenting Shakespeare in his own time. The partners in this exhibition include The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford, The British Library, The Folger Shakespeare Library, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and The National Archives. The exhibition will continue to expand throughout the year.

Sunday Short Takes

A terse round-up this week since I think a cold virus has finally managed to catch me… I’m really surprised it took this long given the exhaustion I’ve had over the past 8 months and the fact that I interact with college students, globe-trotting faculty and research scientists, the general public, and school-aged kids on a regular basis! I guess my immune system just didn’t have enough energy left to fight off this one.

* Conservation plan set to preserve Woking Palace’s future

* Shakespeare first folio discovered at stately home on Scottish island

* Shakespeare’s Buildings

* Conserving Shakespeare’s will and Shakespeare’s will: a new interpretation – from the UK National Archives, where the will is on display

* Virtual Historical Festival – Check the Timetable for more information on the authors taking part

* Wythenshawe Hall: Photos reveal damage to fire-hit Tudor mansion – follow-up to a sad story from a few weeks ago

* 360 Tour of the Tower of London with Dan Snow

Picture of the Week #377

Shakespeare’s Birthplace, Henley Street, Stratford-upon-Avon. Photo May 2015.

Now that we’re into April it’s time for a new theme for the Picture of the Week! And as you may have guessed, this month will feature Shakespeare’s Birthplace in honor of the Bard’s birthday later this month. (Even though the big anniversary this year is the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, I don’t have any recent photos of New Place since it was closed when I was there last year for the project to re-display the site.)