Sunday Short Takes

Even though I had a bunch of articles last weekend, I didn’t get around to doing a round-up post. So, here’s an extra big one!

Lots of Shakespeare news in the past couple of weeks, which I’m sure is just the beginning of the Bard frenzy we’ll see in the next few months leading up to the 400th anniversary of his death in April 2016.

First up – several articles about the recent discoveries in the dig at New Place in Stratford (I admit, I tried to sneak a peek when I was in the town in May but I couldn’t see much):

* Shakespeare’s “kitchen” discovered during archaeological dig (Shakespeare Birthplace Trust)

* Shakespeare’s kitchen discovered in Stratford-upon-Avon dig (BBC)

Want to try your hand at helping to transcribe Shakespearean-era documents?

* Where there’s a quill … help to unpick manuscripts from the days of Shakespeare – article from The Guardian about the project. This is another example of my worlds colliding – this is built on the Zooniverse platform, which started as a citizen science program that I know a lot of scientists who have worked on with everyday people.

* Shakespeare’s World – link to the project itself

And speaking of Shakespearean documents, they will feature in some upcoming exhibitions in 2016:

* William Shakespeare’s last will and testament among key documents going on public show at Somerset House

* Shakespeare was ‘celebrity, matchmaker and theatre thief’, papers reveal

* William Shakespeare’s tryst with a female fanA diary entry, never before seen by the public, will be on display at the British Library next year

And in other news:

* Mary Rose Museum to re-open in 2016 with “best ever”, “unrestricted” views of ship – If you were planning to visit the Mary Rose Museum, you’ll have to wait until the summer of 2016, but it sounds like it will definitely we worth the wait!

* The annual TannerRitchie Publishing Holiday Sale is on, a great opportunity to stock up on digital versions of primary sources.

And finally:

* How to Make a Tudor Christmas Decoration, courtesy of English Heritage and Kenilworth Castle


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