Upcoming Books and Events for March 2015

I know February is a short month to begin with, but it really seems to have flown by this year!

Books

The one book I missed from last month was Virgin Queen by Catherine Corman:

And now on to the new books!

First up is Elizabeth I and Her Circle by Susan Doran. It’s out in March in the UK and June in the US:

Next is Henry VIII’s Last Love: The Extraordinary Life of Katherine Willoughby, Lady-in-Waiting to the Tudors (US title: Henry VIII’s Last Love: The Life of Katherine Willoughby) by David Baldwin will be released March 15 in the UK and May 19 in the US. (And if you’ll allow me a small editorial comment here: I’m very happy to see a new work on Katherine Willoughby out, a fascinating woman in her own right, so it frustrates me that the book has to market her as “Henry VIII’s Last Love”. I understand that all things Henry VIII are hot and that’s what will attract attention but she had an extraordinary life that extended well beyond the death of Henry VIII, so I’m hoping that gets just as much focus. Okay mini-editorial over. 🙂 )

And Thomas Cromwell will be getting a new biography, entitled The Rise of Thomas Cromwell: Power and Politics in the Reign of Henry VIII, 1485-1534 by Michael Everett at the end of March in the UK and end of April in the US:

And finally – the third installment of Nancy Bilyeau’s Joanna Stafford books, The Tapestry, will be released on March 24 in both the UK and US. Stay tuned for a guest post from Nancy in March in conjunction with the book’s release!

Events

After the successful run of the stage versions of Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies by the Royal Shakespeare Company in the UK, the productions have moved to Broadway in the US and will open March 20, 2015 and will run through July 5, 2015 (assuming they don’t extend the run – and I wouldn’t be surprised if that did indeed happen). You can learn more about the Broadway run, including ticket information at wolfhallbroadway.com.


Comments

Upcoming Books and Events for March 2015 — 3 Comments

  1. Hmmm, interesting! The face still looks distorted to me, though – I wonder if the flattening of the nose had any impact on the rest of the face. But Starkey and other historians praised the reconstruction, so I abide by their verdict.

    And looks like I posted this under the wrong entry, oh well.

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