Sunday Short Takes

* Britain’s moral mythology: The 800-year-old ‘medieval encyclopaedia’ written by monks and fit for King Henry VIII goes on display

* Pembrokeshire Tudor trader’s house to open at St Fagans Museum

* Sixteenth-Century Girl’s love for Tudor SuffolkHaving grown up around streets called Anne Boleyn’s Walk and Aragon Avenue, Suzannah Lipscomb couldn’t become anything but a historian with a penchant for the Tudor period, could she? She tells STEVEN RUSSELL about her favourite Tudor spots in Suffolk

* Who was Henry VIII?Suzannah Lipscomb looks beyond the stereotypes that surround our most infamous monarch to ask: who was Henry VIII and when did it all go wrong? – From the History Today archives, reposted for Henry VIII’s birthday last week.

* The story of the Reformation needs reforming – Thought-provoking article from Eamon Duffy in The Telegraph

And finally…

* The Theatre – Archaeology and digital reconstruction of Shakespeare’s first theatre. I’ve embedded the fly-through video below but I recommend watching it on The Theatre’s site to see it larger.

This entry was posted in Archaeology News, General History, Re-enactments and Re-creations, Shakespeare, Tudor History news and events. Bookmark the permalink.

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