Upcoming Books and Exhibitions for December 2016

Books

A couple of books that have already been released in the UK are out in the US this month:

Crown of Blood: The Deadly Inheritance of Lady Jane Grey by Nicola Tallis will be out December 6 in the US.

And Suzannah Lipscomb’s The King is Dead: The Last Will and Testament of Henry VIII that came out last year in the UK is finally getting a US release on December 20th.

One new release this month – First of the Tudors a novel about Jasper Tudor by Joanna Hickson is out December 1 in the UK and out early next year in the US (for the paperback release, it looks like you might be able to get the Kindle edition sooner).

And just in time for the holidays – a great gift idea for you or the Tudor-history lover in your life (or just a celebration of saying a big “Adios!!” to 2016) – The Tudor Planner!

Designed by Heather Teysko of the Renaissance English History Podcast, the planner features:

Each monthly page has a quote from a famous Tudor personality, and a This Month in Tudor History highlight. Plus a listening recommendation for an English Renaissance album for that month (because my particular passion is 16th century music). All of the recommendations are in a public Spotify playlist with the link so you can easily listen whenever you like. The weekly pages have events that happened that month in Tudor history.

Click here or the picture above for more information on how to order your own copy!

Continuing Exhibitions

Windsor Castle will host Shakespeare in the Royal Library from February 13 through January 1, 2017 and includes works of Shakespeare collected by the royal family, accounts of performances at Windsor Castle, and art by members of the royal family inspired by Shakespeare’s plays.

Shakespeare Documented – Celebrating 400 years of William Shakespeare with an online exhibition documenting Shakespeare in his own time. The partners in this exhibition include The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford, The British Library, The Folger Shakespeare Library, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and The National Archives. The exhibition will continue to expand throughout the year.

Sunday Short Takes

How about a round-up of some now-very-outdated-news? 🙂

I’ve skipped the “Marlowe as Shakespeare Co-author” news stories since you couldn’t swing a dead poet without hitting those, so here are a few other things from the past month and a half (UGH) that might have slipped past people that I thought were interesting.

* Human bones mystery uncovered at Anglesey churchThe bones were discovered during a project to clean and restore a rare alabaster stone tomb at St Gredifael’s Church near Menai Bridge. The tomb at Penmynydd is of Goronwy Tudur and his wife Myfanwy – part of Tudor family dynasty. – I visited the tomb myself back in 2000 so I was pleased to see that the it continues to be cared for. This was also the church where the stained glass window honoring the Tudor dynasty was smashed by vandals and then later restored.

* More than £40k raised for Pembroke’s Henry VII statuePlans to erect a statue of Henry VII in Pembrokeshire have moved a step forward.

* Theatre where Hamlet first performed given listed statusThe archaeological remains of two Elizabethan playhouses, one of which saw the first performance of Shakespeare’s Hamlet, have been given listed status. – More info from Historic England: Elizabethan Playhouses and Bear Baiting Arenas Given Protection

And finally –

* Elizabeth I’s Monarchy Classroom Resource from The National Archives – Fantastic collection of primary source documents related to Elizabeth’s life and reign compiled by Dr. Tracy Borman.

Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for November 2016

Books

A few books that have already been released in the UK will be out in the US this month –

First up is The Tudors in 100 Objects by John Matusiak which was released August 1 in the UK and will be out in hardback in the US at the beginning of November:

And Sarah Gristwood’s Game of Queens: The Women Who Made Sixteenth Century Europe which was released last month in the UK and at the end of this month in the US.

And in new books this month, Crown of Blood: The Deadly Inheritance of Lady Jane Grey by Nicola Tallis is out November 3 in the UK and will be out December 6 in the US.

Events

The second of this fall’s BBC History Magazine’s History Weekends is in York from November 18th to 20th.

Continuing Exhibitions

Ending soon – Will & Jane opened on August 6 and will run through November 6 and is the final of three exhibitions at the Folger Shakespeare Library, in addition to other events, during their year-long Wonder of Will celebrations.

Windsor Castle will host Shakespeare in the Royal Library from February 13 through January 1, 2017 and includes works of Shakespeare collected by the royal family, accounts of performances at Windsor Castle, and art by members of the royal family inspired by Shakespeare’s plays.

Shakespeare Documented – Celebrating 400 years of William Shakespeare with an online exhibition documenting Shakespeare in his own time. The partners in this exhibition include The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford, The British Library, The Folger Shakespeare Library, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and The National Archives. The exhibition will continue to expand throughout the year.

Picture of the Week #413

Portrait of Edward VI, attributed to William Scots c. 1550, hanging at Hampton Court Palace. Photo May 2015.

I haven’t done a whole lot of portraits as Pictures of the Week yet, but I got a number of decent photos of paintings at Hampton Court Palace last year so I’m going to start using some going forward. This one is of the birthday boy, Edward VI, born 479 years ago today!

Picture of the Week #412

Wine Fountain and Hampton Court Palace. Photo May 2015.

For October I’ll be featuring Hampton Court Palace in honor of the birth of Edward VI and the death of Jane Seymour. The wine fountain was one of several things that had changed since my visits in 1998 and 2000 which gave me a lot of new things to take pictures of (and boy did I take a lot of photos there last year…).

Upcoming Books, Exhibitions, and Events for October 2016

Books

Starting out with a number of books that slipped past me in the previous months…

First up is The Tudors in 100 Objects by John Matusiak which was released August 1 in the UK and will be out in hardback in the US at the beginning of November:

And Sean Cunningham’s Prince Arthur: The Tudor King Who Never Was came out in the US earlier than I expected, so it is now available!

One that I missed in August that is out in the UK and will be out October 9 in the US is Henry VII’s New Men and the Making of Tudor England by Steven Gunn. Unfortunately this one is ‘academically priced’ (i.e. expensive!) so I’ll have to snag it from the university library at some point.

Melanie Clegg’s Scourge of Henry VIII: The Life of Marie de Guise will be out this month in the US after a release in August in the UK.

In new books this month, Elizabeth Norton’s latest Tudor work, The Lives of Tudor Women is out the first week in October in the UK and will be out next year in the US.

And Catherine of Aragon: An Intimate Life of Henry VIII’s True Wife by Amy Licence is out mid-month in the UK and next spring in the US.

And finally, Sarah Gristwood’s Game of Queens: The Women Who Made Sixteenth Century Europe is out this week in the UK and next month in the US.

Events

The BBC History Magazine’s History Weekends return this fall with one in Winchester from October 7th to 9th and another in York from November 18th to 20th.

Continuing Exhibitions

Will & Jane opened on August 6 and will run through November 6 and is the final of three exhibitions at the Folger Shakespeare Library, in addition to other events, during their year-long Wonder of Will celebrations.

Windsor Castle will host Shakespeare in the Royal Library from February 13 through January 1, 2017 and includes works of Shakespeare collected by the royal family, accounts of performances at Windsor Castle, and art by members of the royal family inspired by Shakespeare’s plays.

Shakespeare Documented – Celebrating 400 years of William Shakespeare with an online exhibition documenting Shakespeare in his own time. The partners in this exhibition include The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford, The British Library, The Folger Shakespeare Library, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and The National Archives. The exhibition will continue to expand throughout the year.

Sunday Short Takes

Good grief, I didn’t expect a month to go by before I got a chance to do one of these again… To say that things have been busy lately would be a wild understatement. The good news is that I’ve earned a fair amount of comp time but the bad news is that I have no idea when I will ever be able to use it!

But enough whinging from me – on to the news round-up!

* The Tudor London Tube Map – This one has already been going around social media for a while now, but it was so clever (and useful for planning a Tudor-themed trip to London) that I had to post it.

* Lost in the Great Fire: which London buildings disappeared in the 1666 blaze? – A look at some of the reasons that many Tudor (and earlier) buildings of London aren’t around to see anymore.

* Bosworth: the dawn of the TudorsFrom childhood imprisonment in Brittany to the violent execution of Richard III in a Leicestershire field, Henry Tudor’s passage to the throne was lengthy and labyrinthine. Chris Skidmore charts the origins of the Tudor dynasty…

* Cleaning This Portrait Could Change the Way Historians See ShakespeareThe only portrait of the Bard made while he was alive might be getting touch-ups

* Revealed: 500-year-old kiln could shed light on the construction of Henry VIII’s Tudor palace in EssexResearchers believe kiln was used when building Palace of Beaulieu

* Virtual Tudors – New website with 3D models of artifacts and more from the wreck of the Mary Rose

Upcoming Tudor History event in Bath

It’s been ages since I’ve done a standalone post about an upcoming event after I started doing the monthly round-ups, but I wanted to get this one that takes place at the end of September out there in time for anyone in the area to have a chance to attend. (Updated to add – big thanks to J. Stephan Edwards of Some Grey Matter for the info on this talk!)


TWILIGHT TALK: Tudor Shirts and Blackwork Decoration

29th September 2016 at 6:00pm at the Fashion Museum, Bath

From the website:

Beneath their ornate doublets and richly decorated robes Tudor men and women of fashion chose to wear fine linen shirts, shifts, and smocks, frequently decorated with beautiful blackwork embroidery. Dr Susan North of the Victoria and Albert Museum will explore this hidden area of dress history, drawing on portraits of the time, as well as rare surviving garments from the time of Queen Elizabeth I.

Dr Susan North, Victoria and Albert Museum is senior curator in the Furniture, Fashion and Textiles Collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, and a leading expert on dress of the 16th century.

Click the link above for information on tickets!

Picture of the Week #408

Entrance to Hall’s Croft, Stratford-upon-Avon. Photo May 2015.

This month we’re going back to Stratford and featuring Hall’s Croft, one of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust properties. Since this property is set a little away from the busiest tourist area of the town, it’s a little quieter and for that reason alone worth seeking out! But it’s also a great place to visit, with period furniture throughout and a lovely back garden.

Hall’s Croft was the first home of Shakespeare’s daughter Susannah and her husband Dr. John Hall after they were married, but they later moved to New Place after her father’s death.